Wrong address on Tinder name-and-shame poster

Posters shaming the alleged love rat have the wrong address for him
BEVAN READ / FAIRFAX NZ

Posters shaming the alleged love rat have the wrong address for him

A rejected Auckland woman who named and shamed her ex-Tinder lover via a leaflet drop has been directing people to the wrong address. 

The highly emotive poster, or "Tinder warning" as it was titled, was spread throughout an inner-city suburb publicising the man's name, address, and workplace, and included a picture of him wearing a baseball cap and holding a beer. 

While the workplace address was correct, the second address listed - supposedly his home address - was the address of a nearby coffee shop.

The poster featured a picture of the heartbreaker, along with both his home and work addresses.
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The poster featured a picture of the heartbreaker, along with both his home and work addresses.

A barista at the cafe said the shamed lover regularly came in for his morning coffee.

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She said one of the leaflets had been slipped under the cafe's front door on Wednesday morning when she came to open shop.

She had recognised the head and shoulders picture of the man - who she said lived in the apartment block next door, because he came in "once or twice a week" for coffee.

She could not provide any more information about the man's lifestyle, or dating habits. 

"He just walks in, says hello and orders his coffee."

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He had not been into the cafe since the posters appeared on Wednesday morning. 

The posters, which can be seen disintegrating on several poles around the targeted area, warned other women off the man and referenced men who "go out of [their] way to lie to and deceive someone in order to use them for sex". 

Text on the leaflet appeared to be a final exchange between the two.

"Frankly, having been tricked into sleeping with someone and then getting them to say every horrible, degrading thing imaginable to you is kind of worse than rape in a lot of ways, and I didn't want to give you any more opportunities to hurt me," the woman wrote.

"My lasting memory of you will be a mistake that causes me feelings of revulsion."

In response, the man apologised and said he honestly wanted a relationship.

"Eventually though, we just didn't click enough. I really am sorry about that."

Auckland Police Senior Sergeant Danny Meade said as far as police knew, no complaint had been laid in regards to the incident.

"It would come under the Harassment Act, but for it to be officially classified as harassment it would have to be a continued action," Meade said.

Meade said there were two aspects to harassment: a consistent action needed to be undertaken, he said, and the person doing the action had to be aware that the action was making the subject uncomfortable.

 - Stuff

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