Majority of workers plan to leave next year

MICHAEL DALY
Last updated 12:36 12/12/2012
Opinion poll

Do you plan to leave your job next year?

Yes, I could do better

No, I'm happy here

I haven't thought about it

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A remarkable 61 per cent of Kiwis plan to leave their jobs in 2013, a survey by human resources company Randstad has found. 

That figure is sharply up from 33 per cent in last year's survey.

The findings are in Randstad's latest World of Work report, which is based on an online survey carried out across the Asia Pacific region.

In this country, 1620 people were surveyed, of whom 970 were employees and 650 were employers.

Randstad New Zealand director Paul Robinson said employees were considerably more optimistic about the opportunities the New Year would bring, compared to 2012 when the economy hitting a number of speed bumps.

"When the economy shows signs of instability, we generally see reduced worker mobility and it's natural in times of uncertainty for workers to tread a cautious path and stick with what they know."

However, the research found an increase in job insecurity among New Zealanders, with 27 per cent of those surveyed saying they felt less secure in their job than they did a year ago, compared to 21 per cent in 2011.

Young workers were more confident, with 21 per cent of Generation Y workers surveyed feeling less secure than they did in 2011. Among mature workers, 40 per cent felt more vulnerable.

Of those planning to leave their jobs next year, 40 per cent said an inability to grow professionally was a major influencing factor, while 16 per cent pointed to an uncompetitive salary, 8 per cent were not well matched to their job, and 8 per cent had a poor relationship with their direct manager.

Broken recruitment promises were another key factor for considering a change in role or career.

 

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- © Fairfax NZ News

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