Sue says we won't go

NOT MOVING: Housing lobbyist Sue Henry holds a map of northern Glen Innes which includes the area she lives in which is  a Housing New Zealand redevelopment project. She'll be asked to leave as a result.
Shane Wenzlick
NOT MOVING: Housing lobbyist Sue Henry holds a map of northern Glen Innes which includes the area she lives in which is a Housing New Zealand redevelopment project. She'll be asked to leave as a result.

Sue Henry normally fights for the housing rights of other Glen Innes residents but is now battling to stay in her own home of almost 40 years.

She and her partner were told on September 26 they would be transferred out of the suburb next year because of a major redevelopment of 156 Housing New Zealand properties.

The proposed northern Glen Innes redevelopment, part of the Tamaki Transformation Programme, aims to cater for future growth by replacing run-down old units with 260 new homes.

CHANGES: Area A and Area B will be redeveloped.
SUPPLIED
CHANGES: Area A and Area B will be redeveloped.

Only 78 of those will be owned by Housing New Zealand, 39 will be owned by other social and community housing providers charging higher rent and the other 143 houses will be for private sale.

Another 40 state houses in the area will be modernised.

State-owned housing accounts for 57 percent of homes in Glen Innes and the aim of the project is to reduce that number and build more state houses in other parts of Auckland with the greatest need.

Ms Henry says she and her partner will not move.

Her partner was promised a state house in Clairville Cres as a returned serviceman in 1956 and was told he could live the rest of his life there, she says.

He is now 87.

"We're close to the town centre and close to all the services we need and I work in the area. My house is the only state house on my side of the street and it isn't cold or mouldy.

"What this is all about is economic cleansing. Poor people are being shunted around and having their homes taken off them to make more money."

Housing New Zealand spokesman Sean Bignell says the corporation wants to achieve a better mix of state, affordable rental and privately owned homes in Glen Innes.

Mr Bignell says the sale of higher value properties in northern Glen Innes will be re-invested into state housing in the area.

"The community has told us it wants better quality affordable rental housing and more opportunities for ownership and that's what this project will provide.

"People living in the area have also told us they want it to be safer, have better schools and transport, more jobs and to be a prosperous and vibrant community. That can't be achieved with the current concentrations of state housing."

He says tenants who are transferred won't be invited back once the development is complete unless they re-apply for a home and the house suits their needs.

Labour candidate for Maungkiekie Carol Beaumont raised the Tamaki housing issue in Parliament based on feedback she received from a housing summit at Ruapotaka Marae on September 26.

She says those who don't want to move deserve more respect. "The government is being really duplicitous on this issue. They're trying to skate over the facts. There has been a prior commitment to keeping the number of state houses in Tamaki the same but now they're going back on their word. I think more questions need to be answered."

Tenants with any questions can phone Housing New Zealand on 0800-801-601 or email tamaki.housingnz@ hnzc.co.nz.

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East And Bays Courier