Futuristic body art on show at awards

NEIL REID
Last updated 19:24 22/09/2012

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Months of meticulous planning and imagination came to life on Auckland's North Shore on Saturday as real-life, but out of this world, creations were unveiled at the New Zealand Body Art Awards.

Artists - and their stunningly painted models - battled it out for silverware in five categories; hand painted, hand painted novice, UV, fantasy creatures and masquerade.

The event - held at the Bruce Mason Theatre, on Auckland's North Shore - was themed 'The Future ... A trip into the Future'.

Event executive producer Jonathan Smith said the show had been 12 months in the making. Artists had been given several months to work on their competition concepts.

Work on the stunning living art forms began at 8am, ahead of the full dress rehearsal eight hours later. A crowd of 1100 was expected to attend the subsequent Saturday night show.

The majority of entrants in the field - which included competitors from New Zealand, Australia, America and also South America - were not professional artists.

Smith described the models as features of ''moving art''.

''The artists come from anywhere and everywhere,'' Smith said.

''Naturally there are some who might be going to one of the academies, they might be doing design and prosthetic work. But there are people out there that have normal day jobs, but they have quite a strong leaning towards body art and prosthetic work.

''What I like to think is that this event gives them a chance to showcase their art.''

The judging panel for the awards - which were to confirmed late on Saturday night - included Weta Workshop's Sir Richard Taylor.

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- Fairfax Media

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