'Nightmare' woman faces deportation

AMY MAAS
Last updated 11:29 02/02/2013

Relevant offers

National News

'Shoddy' EQC repairs leave Christchurch homeowner with wonky floor Livingstone inquest: Questions remain about double murder-suicide Liam Livingstone scores world record 350 in one-day cricket match Annual inflation just 0.1 per cent, lowest since 1999 Bus driver denies sex charges Scott Dixon wins IndyCar race in Los Angeles The Stories: The children left behind when the American soldiers departed from Vietnam Think your dad is embarrassing? Be glad you're not Brooklyn Beckham Troops in fight against Islamic State 'splendid sons of Anzacs' - Abbott Aussies warned: $1m isn't enough for a comfy retirement

A New Zealand woman described as a “pharmacological nightmare” will be deported from Australia after running over and killing two young boys while high on prescription medication.

Tania Clark, 41, who has a string of criminal convictions in Australia, has been serving a 10-year prison sentence at the Brisbane Women's Correctional Centre after the February 7, 2008 manslaughter.

On that day, Clark had consumed two cans of bourbon and coke and the prescription drugs valium, oxazapan, temazepan, codeine and doxylimen were found in her system. She had also consumed cannabis.

She was in the third week of an 18-month probation period after stealing 425 temazepan tablets from a pharmacy.

Trying to beat traffic to her probation meeting, Clark mounted a curb and drove along the footpath where she fatally struck the two children.

An Immigration Australia decision released last week said Clark was a “pharmacological nightmare” who was “extraordinarily reckless”. The 22-year resident of Australia will have her visa cancelled and she will be deported to New Zealand when she is released from prison.

In arguing the decision to cancel her visa, Clark described herself as a “different person” after undergoing a range of rehabilitation programs in prison “giving her insight into her previous behaviour”.

However, Australian immigration authorities found that Clark did not “satisfy the character test” in the Immigration Act because of her criminal history.

“I am satisfied that the protection of the Australian community is more significant in Mrs Clark's case,” the decision read.

“The nature and frequency of Mrs Clark's criminal conduct, and the likelihood of her re-offending is in conflict with an objective of the Act; that is, to protect the Australian community from unacceptable risks of harm as a result of criminal activity or other serious conduct by a non-citizen.”

Clark, who is married to an Australian citizen, has lived in the country since 1991.

Ad Feedback

- Sunday Star Times

Comments

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content