'Unpredictable' crim gives judge the finger

Last updated 09:25 12/02/2013

Relevant offers

National News

Former bank employee sentenced for $400k theft Koala's 'remarkable' journey Police detainees surveyed on drug use Mark Feary 'relieved to be alive' Judge chuckles at chip shop burglar Call to end king's reign Fears over gunpoint captivity of mum and son Conservative Party logo rejected Crises 'show effects of US disengagement' UN Security Council demands Gaza ceasefire

A man convicted of multiple charges made a rude gesture to a judge after he was sentenced to prison.

Joel Twain McVay, 34, held up his middle finger to the judge, told him he would not follow some of his sentence, and swore at a police officer after his sentencing in the Blenheim District Court yesterday.

McVay was sentenced on his fourth drink-driving conviction and 19th conviction for driving while disqualified, as well as burning his partner's belongings and assaulting her.

Judge Richard Russell said it was McVay's 10th assault conviction. He sentenced him to two years and one month in prison after he admitted charges of refusing to give a blood sample, driving while disqualified, assault and wilful damage. McVay was also ordered to pay reparation of $1233 to his former partner, indefinitely disqualified from driving and ordered to hold a zero alcohol licence for three years if he got his licence back.

Judge Russell said McVay had an argument on September 11, 2012 with his partner at a backpackers they were living at in Seddon. He burnt her belongings and food. He also slapped her when she came the next morning to get her remaining belongings back.

In her victim impact statement the woman said it was the second time McVay had burnt her belongings and he was unpredictable.

In the second incident, the judge said police saw McVay driving about 2.05am on October 28, after having seen him very drunk earlier that night. McVay tried to hide from the officers, but was found and given an initial breath test which registered him as being over the legal limit, he said.

McVay was taken to the police station, but refused to take a breath test or give blood, saying he abided by Maori law.

When Judge Russell ordered McVay to pay the reparation to his former partner, McVay called out that he wouldn't and tried to leave the dock, swearing at the police officer.

Ad Feedback

- The Marlborough Express

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content