Beautiful side of urban development showcased in photography festival show

Photographer uses colour and geometry to light a different way of looking at 'ugly' development.
Supplied/Robert Nelson

Photographer uses colour and geometry to light a different way of looking at 'ugly' development.

The alteration of New Zealand's natural landscape by urban development can be a contentious issue in environmental circles. 

However, photographer Robert "Bob" Nelson is using his camera to shed light on a new way of observing people's impact on the countryside. 

Light Industry is a playful reflection of its subject matter, which depicts how industrial development has visually impacted on the environment. 

Photographer Robert "Bob" Nelson says he has successfully turned his hobby into an obsession.
Supplied

Photographer Robert "Bob" Nelson says he has successfully turned his hobby into an obsession.

Having dubbed himself as the "objective observer", the Northcote Point resident said urban development gets a bad rap, most of the time.

READ MORE:
* Auckland photography exhibition captures abandoned, forgotten houses
The art of urban exploration

"I wanted to showcase another way of looking at urban development, through their colours and geometry," he said.

Light Industry opens at Depot Artspace in Devonport, May 27.
Supplied/Robert Nelson

Light Industry opens at Depot Artspace in Devonport, May 27.

"To reinterpret what people would think of as being banal or ugly."

Light Industry is Nelson's first exhibition, and comes to Devonport's Depot Artspace as a part of this year's Auckland Festival of Photography.

In his 15 to 20 photo-strong exhibition, Nelson has included industrial landscapes from around New Zealand, including two from North Shore communities Glenfield and Albany.

Now retired, Nelson said he has successfully turned his hobby into an obsession.

Ad Feedback

Having spent most of his life working in factories, it's nice to be looking at them from a different angle, he said.

"Depending on how you look at things, it's not always ugly."

This body of work is influenced primarily by The New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-Altered Landscape exhibition, which was the first time topographic images were represented as landscapes.

Depot Artspace's creative director Linda Blincko said she likes the take Nelson has taken on the movement of developing infrastructure.

This movement being not only cultural, but, in Nelson's case, structural, Blincko said. 

Light Industry is open May 27 to June 14 at Depot Artspace, Devonport.

Visit rgnelsonphoto.com.

 

 - Stuff

Ad Feedback
special offers
Ad Feedback