Second video of Auckland great white emerges video

Julie Bluck

A great white shark visited a number of fishing boats in the Hauraki Gulf over the weekend.

Great white shark sightings in the Hauraki Gulf have made a splash on social media.

Possibly the same shark gave at least two boats a curious once over on the north side of Whangaparaoa peninsula over the weekend.

A video posted to the Hibiscus Coast Facebook page on Sunday by Staffan Ljunggren shows a juvenile great white approach the back of a boat and lift its mouth out of the water to 'smile' at the camera.

A still from the video uploaded to Facebook by Staffan Ljunggren.
STAFFAN LJUNGGREN

A still from the video uploaded to Facebook by Staffan Ljunggren.

The shark then rolls to expose its side as it swims past, just inches from the boat.

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The video has racked up over 30 thousand views, with some commenters saying their swimming days are over for this summer.

Julie Bluck snapped this photo on the same day. A hook can be seen in the corner of the shark's mouth.
Julie Bluck

Julie Bluck snapped this photo on the same day. A hook can be seen in the corner of the shark's mouth.

A second video was captured by Julie Bluck in a fishing boat 400 metres off Stanmore Bay's eastern point. 

The video shows possibly the same shark biting down on a plastic berley bomb.

It also took a bite out of the boat's fishing anchor, which now has a few holes in it where the teeth have punctured.

The holes on the sea anchor bitten by the great white.
Julie Bluck

The holes on the sea anchor bitten by the great white.

A photo taken by Bluck shows a fishing hook in the corner of its mouth, proving its weekend encounters with fishing boats weren't its first. 

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Marine scientist and shark expert Clinton Duffy says great white sightings are "quite a regular thing" in the Hauraki Gulf, but "most people are generally pretty bad at identifying sharks".

Duffy says the great whites usually spotted in the Hauraki Gulf are predominantly juveniles up to three metres long.

Not known to congregate anywhere in the gulf, Duffy says these great whites "spread over a large area following fish around" and are usually only found by chance.

"It's not uncommon for them to swim up to boats, and white sharks often check out berley," Duffy says.

"If it's on the bottom, you're never going to know about it."

Duffy says great whites are most commonly confused with makos.

Although they have "broadly similar features", Duffy says great whites tend to be more grey or brown in colour, whereas makos are indigo.

Great whites also have heavier builds and have broader pectoral fins with black spots on the undersides.

 - Rodney Times

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