Sculptors work with stone and glass

Sculptures Roselle Amoore and Lauren Kitts are exploring the essence of nature in their upcoming exhibition.
1 of 6Nicola Murphy
Sculptures Roselle Amoore and Lauren Kitts are exploring the essence of nature in their upcoming exhibition.
This sculpture, by Lauren Kitts, features in Essence at Upstairs Gallery.
2 of 6
This sculpture, by Lauren Kitts, features in Essence at Upstairs Gallery.
Sub-atomic sculpture by Lauren Kitts.
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Sub-atomic sculpture by Lauren Kitts.
The other side of the Sub-atomic sculpture.
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The other side of the Sub-atomic sculpture.
A sample of Roselle Amoore's work.
5 of 6Nicola Murphy
A sample of Roselle Amoore's work.
A sample of Roselle Amoore's glass work.
6 of 6Nicola Murphy
A sample of Roselle Amoore's glass work.

 

They haven't known each other long but sculptors Roselle Amoore and Lauren Kitts have a lot in common.

They both work in solid, heavy materials that are difficult to manipulate.

Ms Amoore works with glass while Ms Kitts uses stone to create her works.

They will both be exhibiting in an upcoming show called Essence at Upstairs Gallery in Titirangi.

"It's about our interpretation of nature," Ms Amoore says.

"We're interested in distilling things down to their basic state."

Ms Amoore lives in Titirangi but is originally from the UK.

She will display work made out of cast glass which appears frosted and others made of fused glass which is heated and moulded in a kiln.

A number of her pieces are vividly-coloured representations of kauri.

"You're taking something from outside and interpreting it differently," she says.

Ms Amoore uses a variety of techniques to produce her work including the lost wax method where a plaster mold is created around a wax model.

The wax is then melted and drained away, leaving the mold open to be filled with molten sculpture material.

She also cuts glass and then bakes it up to five times in a kiln – this is known as fusing.

Ms Kitts came to live in Swanson from the United States.

She often works outside as she uses large pieces of marble, granite and andesite.

She uses power tools with diamond fittings to chisel away much of the stone to gradually create sculptures.

Her pieces vary in size but the largest is about 1.3 metres by 0.8 metres.

One of her pieces in the exhibition is so heavy she is hiring a truck with a built-in crane to transport it to the gallery.

The pair is looking forward to the show and exhibiting together.

"We complement each other nicely," Ms Amoore says.

Essence opens at Upstairs Gallery, Level 1, 418 Titirangi Rd, on February 17.

Western Leader