From paper worlds to a picture book

Kate Parker's paper sculptures were crafted during her artist residency at Anawhata in 2016.
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Kate Parker's paper sculptures were crafted during her artist residency at Anawhata in 2016.

Kate Parker hopes to inspire people to protect trees with her paper art.

The miniature paper worlds, on display at Arataki Visitors Centre, were inspired by her eight-week artist's residency at Anawhata.

During her time at Anawhata, Parker says she walked a lot and learnt about the history of tree clearing in the region.

Kate Parker's exhibition is on display at the Arataki Visitors Centre until February 28.
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Kate Parker's exhibition is on display at the Arataki Visitors Centre until February 28.

The hand-made paper artworks tell a story about the migration of people and land change.

Parker says her story Kowhai and the Giants is told with ten light boxes.

It follows a character she says is "a watching spirit that lives in the trees".

Parker's paper sculptures tell the story of Kowhai and the Giants.
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Parker's paper sculptures tell the story of Kowhai and the Giants.

The character carries light that she feeds to the "giants" or trees.

Parker says one of her favourite boxes includes a ladder from the ground up to the moon.

The art displayed ends half-way through her story, with the trees being gone. The next stage of the story will be about the future, she says.

Parker hopes her art will inspire people to protect the Waitakere Ranges.
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Parker hopes her art will inspire people to protect the Waitakere Ranges.

Parker says she intends to create a picture book using the art when it is finished.

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She says she hopes people will take away knowledge of the bush's history, an understanding of its preciousness, and be inspired to take care of it.

It's about finding new ways to interact with audiences about issues like kauri dieback, the artist says.

Parker developed the idea over four-to-five months, before her residency.

Her background in theatre meant she used similar process for creating the paper worlds.

She says drawing was challenging but she improved throughout the process.

The Keddle House where she stayed is a solar-powered 1930's bungalow, located above Anawhata Beach.

She says wildness and beauty of the coast was unexpected.

"It was the most peaceful place."

The exhibition is free and runs until 28 February at Arataki Visitor Centre.

It is part of Auckland Council Regional Parks' annual Artist in Residence programme.

Artists can apply to be the 2017 Artist in Residence. For further information head to the Auckland Council website or contact Artist in Residence programme manager Michelle Edge on 021 857 003. The selected artist for 2017 will live and work for an eight-week period in either Long Bay Regional Park or Te Muri (Mahurangi Regional Park) from mid-October to mid-December 2017.

 - Western Leader

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