Revenue plummets, owners consider shutting shop

Mahvash Ali/STUFF.CO.NZ

New Lynn business owners say business is bad.

The shops are open, but there are no customers.

Business owners on one of Auckland's busiest roads say revenue has plummeted in the last three months, and some face closing their doors.

Remedial work was being carried out on Great North Rd in New Lynn to repair the damage from the flash floods that swept through west Auckland on March 12.

Ram Shalendra of Juleez Kitchen says sales have halved and he can't even pay the weekly rent anymore.
MAHVASH ALI/FAIRFAX NZ

Ram Shalendra of Juleez Kitchen says sales have halved and he can't even pay the weekly rent anymore.

Ram Shalendra of Juleez Kitchen, who had a six-year lease on his shop, said he was desperate to sell his business.

He said his takeaway's revenue had decreased by 50 per cent since the floods.

"I cannot even make the rent."

Ravinder Singh of Kio Ora Superette in New Lynn says business is down.
MAHVASH ALI/FAIRFAX NZ

Ravinder Singh of Kio Ora Superette in New Lynn says business is down.

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Great North Rd connects west Auckland to the city. It suffered significant damage after a culvert located underneath the road was blocked during the March floods, and stormwater overflowed leading to the footpath's collapse.

The road remained closed for a month between March 12 and April 14 as excess stormwater was pumped across the road. 

Ismail Ibrahim owns Paasha Turkish Kitchen in New Lynn, he says revenue has gone down by 40 per cent since the floods.
MAHVASH ALI/FAIRFAX NZ

Ismail Ibrahim owns Paasha Turkish Kitchen in New Lynn, he says revenue has gone down by 40 per cent since the floods.

The works are continuing, and will do for some months as a new culvert is installed.

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Kia Ora Superette manager Ravinder Singh said he had to often toss up between buying stock or paying rent.

He said "the little" revenue he had was from sales to the road workers who occasionally popped in.  

Geoff Siale-Thomas,24, is a tattoo artists at Western Tattoo in New Lynn.
MAHVASH ALI/FAIRFAX NZ

Geoff Siale-Thomas,24, is a tattoo artists at Western Tattoo in New Lynn.

"Half our sale is gone."

For Ismail Ibrahim of Paasha Turkish Kitchen, who had owned the restaurant for 18 months, lunch traffic had reduced by about 75 per cent.

He said he considered selling his shop, especially because last week's staff wages came out of his own pocket.

Geoff Siale-Thomas says he is not getting as many clients as he used to before the March flooding in New Lynn.
MAHVASH ALI/FAIRFAX NZ

Geoff Siale-Thomas says he is not getting as many clients as he used to before the March flooding in New Lynn.

Ibrahim said 40 - 50 people came in for lunch on a daily basis, but now that number had reduced to 15 customers at the most.

"There are no customers," he said. 

Geoff Siale-Thomas, a tattoo artist based at Western Tattoo, said he had been working at the studio for eight months and the last three months were the quietest the shop had ever been.

He said before the floods he had at least three clients a day, but now that number was down to two a week.

Chairwoman of the Whau Local Board, and manager of the New Lynn Business Association, Tracy Mulholland said help was on its way. 

She said there would be a strong push of a "New Lynn's open for business" message on social media and in the media.

There was also going to be 'Food Fiesta' campaign that would run for six weeks starting in July. 

These included voucher booklets customers could use to get discounts at various food outlets in New Lynn. 

 - Stuff

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