90 Seconds capturing attention online

ENGAGING FOCUS: 90 Seconds director Tim Norton and business development manager Dave Insull say their videos can help track visitor engagement on clients' websites.
ENGAGING FOCUS: 90 Seconds director Tim Norton and business development manager Dave Insull say their videos can help track visitor engagement on clients' websites.

Flash commercial videos used to be the domain of big business but Wellington startup 90 Seconds reckons it has found a niche serving up high-quality, low-cost web videos to small and medium-sized firms.

The company makes and distributes videos for the web and its customers include Kiwibank, MYOB, Tourism Holdings and Rex Bionics – the Auckland firm behind the robotic exoskeleton that allows wheelchair users to stand and walk.

Director Tim Norton, who is also chief executive of business plan software company Plan HQ – says 90 Seconds has churned out more than 600 videos since February.

Research shows 82 per cent of web visitors will click on a video if they see one, he says.

"If you've got a video on your site then you get them engaged, whether they buy something online or pick the phone up, they are already interested in the product and they're pre-educated."

Firms could track visitor engagement on their sites and place videos at points where interest dropped off, he says.

Rex Bionics used its video – which was featured on YouTube's homepage – to drum up investment overseas; Tourism Holdings showcases adventure tourism such as caving and black-water rafting via online clips. Dutch record label Armada Music commissions a music video from 90 Seconds about once a month, with each video attracting about 50,000 views within the first 24 hours of going live, Mr Norton says.

90 Seconds has seven staff, including a videographer, an animator, two camera operators and a production manager.

Firms looking for videos traditionally had to go to ad agencies or production companies. "That is associated with high costs and long timeframes, and it's not affordable for small to medium businesses. It also doesn't fit into the new medium of the internet – where consumers want real people on camera, they don't want actors.

"Our approach has been to come in and say, `let's focus purely on the web and it's got to be fast at low costs with high personality'."

90 Seconds' video service costs about $2500 – a quarter of what agencies charge for web videos – but that price comes down if multiple videos are made.

Business development manager Dave Insull says customers decide where they want their videos to go, but 90 Seconds usually distributes them on 15 international video networks, including YouTube, and can "optimise" them so they are easily found by online search engines.

The firm plans to offer video-as-a-service, charging small businesses and individual retailers a low monthly fee for providing online video – which could be filmed, edited and distributed from anywhere in the world. "It's all going towards a model where you pay monthly as you get results – it might be a lead generation or someone just filling out a form."

BusinessDay.co.nz