Website woes haunt business owners

TOM HUNT
Last updated 05:00 27/08/2014
KENT BLECHYNDEN

Douglas and Sophie Voon have a fashion label and bridal shop on Willis St but, now, no website.

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Tangled websites have left dozens of businesses fuming that they can't catch customers online.

Douglas Voon, whose wife runs fashion and bridal shops on Wellington's CBD Willis St, only realised on Sunday that their websites - voon.co.nz and sophievoon.com - could not be accessed.

He could not contact the company which hosts the website, called 24/7 Hosting. That meant Voon was unable to "wrestle" control of the websites back and was getting another website - not through 24/7 - up and running. Emails to 24/7 had bounced back.

It was hard to say how much the problem had cost the shops, he said.

Customers of 24/7 were being told they needed to find a new provider.

In Christchurch, online laptop and parts supplier Laptop Battery was losing up to $10,000 in business a day while its website was down, manager Kelvin Johnston said.

Daniel Jospeh Suter, from Laptop Battery, said some access was restored early this week but not before he had sleepless nights.

Frustrated customers have taken to 24/7's Facebook page to vent their anger.

"Guys, it doesn't work . . . how badly can you keep shooting yourself in the foot, my gosh!!," Pearce Stephens said after a new owner took over 24/7 in July.

Darcy Kemp asked: "Has anyone heard if they are at least going to turn the servers back on so we can 'copy'/download our stuff?"

24/7 hosts and looks after some websites with the .nz ending, and also buys and sells website names.

But it has hit problems - first signalled by Domain Name Commission (DNC) in May - meaning many websites cannot be opened, while even the companies who own the sites cannot access them.

24/7 controlled about 3000 web addresses that ended in .nz. For many of those it also hosted their websites, DNC spokesman Campbell Gardiner said.

Not all had been affected but all could face problems down the track, especially as people tried to renew their domain name, he said.

Throughout the process, 24/7 had remained "uncontactable" and provided "poor to non-existent services".

DNC is an industry regulator for .nz web addresses. It has the power to sanction web address providers who do not abide by .nz policy. As far back as May, DNC was warning people that 24/7 was not meeting its requirements but said a change of ownership was in the pipeline.

While 24/7 could not be contacted by The Dominion Post, its Facebook page said there was a new owner and issues were being sorted out. But Gardiner yesterday said there had been no improvement in service.

TANGLED websites have left dozens of businesses fuming that they can't catch customers online.

Douglas Voon, whose wife runs fashion and bridal shops on Willis St, only realised on Sunday that their websites - voon.co.nz and sophievoon.com - could not be accessed. He could not contact the company which hosts the website, called 24/7 Hosting. That meant Voon was unable to "wrestle" control of the websites back and was getting another website - not through 24/7 - up and running. Emails to 24/7 had bounced back.

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It was hard to say how much the problem had cost the shops, he said.

Customers of 24/7 were being told they needed to find a new provider.

In Christchurch, online laptop and parts supplier Laptop Battery was losing up to $10,000 in business a day while its website was down, manager Kelvin Johnston said.

Daniel Jospeh Suter, from Laptop Battery, said some access was restored early this week but not before he had sleepless nights.

Frustrated customers have taken to 24/7's Facebook page to vent their anger.

"Guys, it doesn't work . . . how badly can you keep shooting yourself in the foot, my gosh!!," Pearce Stephens said after a new owner took over 24/7 in July.

Darcy Kemp asked: "Has anyone heard if they are at least going to turn the servers back on so we can 'copy'/download our stuff?"

24/7 hosts and looks after some websites with the .nz ending, and also buys and sells website names.

But it has hit problems - first signalled by Domain Name Commission (DNC) in May - meaning many websites cannot be opened, while even the companies who own the sites cannot access them.

24/7 controlled about 3000 web addresses that ended in .nz. For many of those it also hosted their websites, DNC spokesman Campbell Gardiner said.

Not all had been affected but all could face problems down the track, especially as people tried to renew their domain name, he said.

Throughout the process, 24/7 had remained "uncontactable" and provided "poor to non-existent services".

DNC is an industry regulator for .nz web addresses. It has the power to sanction web address providers who do not abide by .nz policy. As far back as May, DNC was warning people that 24/7 was not meeting its requirements but said a change of ownership was in the pipeline.

While 24/7 could not be contacted by The Dominion Post, its Facebook page said there was a new owner and issues were being sorted out. But Gardiner yesterday said there had been no improvement in service.

TANGLED websites have left dozens of businesses fuming that they can't catch customers online.

Douglas Voon, whose wife runs fashion and bridal shops on Willis St, only realised on Sunday that their websites - voon.co.nz and sophievoon.com - could not be accessed. He could not contact the company which hosts the website, called 24/7 Hosting. That meant Voon was unable to "wrestle" control of the websites back and was getting another website - not through 24/7 - up and running. Emails to 24/7 had bounced back.

It was hard to say how much the problem had cost the shops, he said.

Customers of 24/7 were being told they needed to find a new provider.

In Christchurch, online laptop and parts supplier Laptop Battery was losing up to $10,000 in business a day while its website was down, manager Kelvin Johnston said.

Daniel Jospeh Suter, from Laptop Battery, said some access was restored early this week but not before he had sleepless nights.

Frustrated customers have taken to 24/7's Facebook page to vent their anger.

"Guys, it doesn't work . . . how badly can you keep shooting yourself in the foot, my gosh!!," Pearce Stephens said after a new owner took over 24/7 in July.

Darcy Kemp asked: "Has anyone heard if they are at least going to turn the servers back on so we can 'copy'/download our stuff?"

24/7 hosts and looks after some websites with the .nz ending, and also buys and sells website names.

But it has hit problems - first signalled by Domain Name Commission (DNC) in May - meaning many websites cannot be opened, while even the companies who own the sites cannot access them.

24/7 controlled about 3000 web addresses that ended in .nz. For many of those it also hosted their websites, DNC spokesman Campbell Gardiner said.

Not all had been affected but all could face problems down the track, especially as people tried to renew their domain name, he said.

Throughout the process, 24/7 had remained "uncontactable" and provided "poor to non-existent services".

DNC is an industry regulator for .nz web addresses. It has the power to sanction web address providers who do not abide by .nz policy. As far back as May, DNC was warning people that 24/7 was not meeting its requirements but said a change of ownership was in the pipeline.

While 24/7 could not be contacted by The Dominion Post, its Facebook page said there was a new owner and issues were being sorted out. But Gardiner yesterday said there had been no improvement in service.

TANGLED websites have left dozens of businesses fuming that they can't catch customers online.

Douglas Voon, whose wife runs fashion and bridal shops on Willis St, only realised on Sunday that their websites - voon.co.nz and sophievoon.com - could not be accessed. He could not contact the company which hosts the website, called 24/7 Hosting. That meant Voon was unable to "wrestle" control of the websites back and was getting another website - not through 24/7 - up and running. Emails to 24/7 had bounced back.

It was hard to say how much the problem had cost the shops, he said.

Customers of 24/7 were being told they needed to find a new provider.

In Christchurch, online laptop and parts supplier Laptop Battery was losing up to $10,000 in business a day while its website was down, manager Kelvin Johnston said.

Daniel Jospeh Suter, from Laptop Battery, said some access was restored early this week but not before he had sleepless nights.

Frustrated customers have taken to 24/7's Facebook page to vent their anger.

"Guys, it doesn't work . . . how badly can you keep shooting yourself in the foot, my gosh!!," Pearce Stephens said after a new owner took over 24/7 in July.

Darcy Kemp asked: "Has anyone heard if they are at least going to turn the servers back on so we can 'copy'/download our stuff?"

24/7 hosts and looks after some websites with the .nz ending, and also buys and sells website names.

But it has hit problems - first signalled by Domain Name Commission (DNC) in May - meaning many websites cannot be opened, while even the companies who own the sites cannot access them.

24/7 controlled about 3000 web addresses that ended in .nz. For many of those it also hosted their websites, DNC spokesman Campbell Gardiner said.

Not all had been affected but all could face problems down the track, especially as people tried to renew their domain name, he said.

Throughout the process, 24/7 had remained "uncontactable" and provided "poor to non-existent services".

DNC is an industry regulator for .nz web addresses. It has the power to sanction web address providers who do not abide by .nz policy. As far back as May, DNC was warning people that 24/7 was not meeting its requirements but said a change of ownership was in the pipeline.

While 24/7 could not be contacted by The Dominion Post, its Facebook page said there was a new owner and issues were being sorted out. But Gardiner yesterday said there had been no improvement in service.

TANGLED websites have left dozens of businesses fuming that they can't catch customers online.

Douglas Voon, whose wife runs fashion and bridal shops on Willis St, only realised on Sunday that their websites - voon.co.nz and sophievoon.com - could not be accessed. He could not contact the company which hosts the website, called 24/7 Hosting. That meant Voon was unable to "wrestle" control of the websites back and was getting another website - not through 24/7 - up and running. Emails to 24/7 had bounced back.

It was hard to say how much the problem had cost the shops, he said.

Customers of 24/7 were being told they needed to find a new provider.

In Christchurch, online laptop and parts supplier Laptop Battery was losing up to $10,000 in business a day while its website was down, manager Kelvin Johnston said.

Daniel Jospeh Suter, from Laptop Battery, said some access was restored early this week but not before he had sleepless nights.

Frustrated customers have taken to 24/7's Facebook page to vent their anger.

"Guys, it doesn't work . . . how badly can you keep shooting yourself in the foot, my gosh!!," Pearce Stephens said after a new owner took over 24/7 in July.

Darcy Kemp asked: "Has anyone heard if they are at least going to turn the servers back on so we can 'copy'/download our stuff?"

24/7 hosts and looks after some websites with the .nz ending, and also buys and sells website names.

But it has hit problems - first signalled by Domain Name Commission (DNC) in May - meaning many websites cannot be opened, while even the companies who own the sites cannot access them.

24/7 controlled about 3000 web addresses that ended in .nz. For many of those it also hosted their websites, DNC spokesman Campbell Gardiner said.

Not all had been affected but all could face problems down the track, especially as people tried to renew their domain name, he said.

Throughout the process, 24/7 had remained "uncontactable" and provided "poor to non-existent services".

DNC is an industry regulator for .nz web addresses. It has the power to sanction web address providers who do not abide by .nz policy. As far back as May, DNC was warning people that 24/7 was not meeting its requirements but said a change of ownership was in the pipeline.

While 24/7 could not be contacted by The Dominion Post, its Facebook page said there was a new owner and issues were being sorted out. But Gardiner yesterday said there had been no improvement in service.

TANGLED websites have left dozens of businesses fuming that they can't catch customers online.

Douglas Voon, whose wife runs fashion and bridal shops on Willis St, only realised on Sunday that their websites - voon.co.nz and sophievoon.com - could not be accessed. He could not contact the company which hosts the website, called 24/7 Hosting. That meant Voon was unable to "wrestle" control of the websites back and was getting another website - not through 24/7 - up and running. Emails to 24/7 had bounced back.

It was hard to say how much the problem had cost the shops, he said.

Customers of 24/7 were being told they needed to find a new provider.

In Christchurch, online laptop and parts supplier Laptop Battery was losing up to $10,000 in business a day while its website was down, manager Kelvin Johnston said.

Daniel Jospeh Suter, from Laptop Battery, said some access was restored early this week but not before he had sleepless nights.

Frustrated customers have taken to 24/7's Facebook page to vent their anger.

"Guys, it doesn't work . . . how badly can you keep shooting yourself in the foot, my gosh!!," Pearce Stephens said after a new owner took over 24/7 in July.

Darcy Kemp asked: "Has anyone heard if they are at least going to turn the servers back on so we can 'copy'/download our stuff?"

24/7 hosts and looks after some websites with the .nz ending, and also buys and sells website names.

But it has hit problems - first signalled by Domain Name Commission (DNC) in May - meaning many websites cannot be opened, while even the companies who own the sites cannot access them.

24/7 controlled about 3000 web addresses that ended in .nz. For many of those it also hosted their websites, DNC spokesman Campbell Gardiner said.

Not all had been affected but all could face problems down the track, especially as people tried to renew their domain name, he said.

Throughout the process, 24/7 had remained "uncontactable" and provided "poor to non-existent services".

DNC is an industry regulator for .nz web addresses. It has the power to sanction web address providers who do not abide by .nz policy. As far back as May, DNC was warning people that 24/7 was not meeting its requirements but said a change of ownership was in the pipeline.

While 24/7 could not be contacted by The Dominion Post, its Facebook page said there was a new owner and issues were being sorted out. But Gardiner yesterday said there had been no improvement in service.

TANGLED websites have left dozens of businesses fuming that they can't catch customers online.

Douglas Voon, whose wife runs fashion and bridal shops on Willis St, only realised on Sunday that their websites - voon.co.nz and sophievoon.com - could not be accessed. He could not contact the company which hosts the website, called 24/7 Hosting. That meant Voon was unable to "wrestle" control of the websites back and was getting another website - not through 24/7 - up and running. Emails to 24/7 had bounced back.

It was hard to say how much the problem had cost the shops, he said.

Customers of 24/7 were being told they needed to find a new provider.

In Christchurch, online laptop and parts supplier Laptop Battery was losing up to $10,000 in business a day while its website was down, manager Kelvin Johnston said.

Daniel Jospeh Suter, from Laptop Battery, said some access was restored early this week but not before he had sleepless nights.

Frustrated customers have taken to 24/7's Facebook page to vent their anger.

"Guys, it doesn't work . . . how badly can you keep shooting yourself in the foot, my gosh!!," Pearce Stephens said after a new owner took over 24/7 in July.

Darcy Kemp asked: "Has anyone heard if they are at least going to turn the servers back on so we can 'copy'/download our stuff?"

24/7 hosts and looks after some websites with the .nz ending, and also buys and sells website names.

But it has hit problems - first signalled by Domain Name Commission (DNC) in May - meaning many websites cannot be opened, while even the companies who own the sites cannot access them.

24/7 controlled about 3000 web addresses that ended in .nz. For many of those it also hosted their websites, DNC spokesman Campbell Gardiner said.

Not all had been affected but all could face problems down the track, especially as people tried to renew their domain name, he said.

Throughout the process, 24/7 had remained "uncontactable" and provided "poor to non-existent services".

DNC is an industry regulator for .nz web addresses. It has the power to sanction web address providers who do not abide by .nz policy. As far back as May, DNC was warning people that 24/7 was not meeting its requirements but said a change of ownership was in the pipeline.

While 24/7 could not be contacted by The Dominion Post, its Facebook page said there was a new owner and issues were being sorted out. But Gardiner yesterday said there had been no improvement in service.

TANGLED websites have left dozens of businesses fuming that they can't catch customers online.

Douglas Voon, whose wife runs fashion and bridal shops on Willis St, only realised on Sunday that their websites - voon.co.nz and sophievoon.com - could not be accessed. He could not contact the company which hosts the website, called 24/7 Hosting. That meant Voon was unable to "wrestle" control of the websites back and was getting another website - not through 24/7 - up and running. Emails to 24/7 had bounced back.

It was hard to say how much the problem had cost the shops, he said.

Customers of 24/7 were being told they needed to find a new provider.

In Christchurch, online laptop and parts supplier Laptop Battery was losing up to $10,000 in business a day while its website was down, manager Kelvin Johnston said.

Daniel Jospeh Suter, from Laptop Battery, said some access was restored early this week but not before he had sleepless nights.

Frustrated customers have taken to 24/7's Facebook page to vent their anger.

"Guys, it doesn't work . . . how badly can you keep shooting yourself in the foot, my gosh!!," Pearce Stephens said after a new owner took over 24/7 in July.

Darcy Kemp asked: "Has anyone heard if they are at least going to turn the servers back on so we can 'copy'/download our stuff?"

24/7 hosts and looks after some websites with the .nz ending, and also buys and sells website names.

But it has hit problems - first signalled by Domain Name Commission (DNC) in May - meaning many websites cannot be opened, while even the companies who own the sites cannot access them.

24/7 controlled about 3000 web addresses that ended in .nz. For many of those it also hosted their websites, DNC spokesman Campbell Gardiner said.

Not all had been affected but all could face problems down the track, especially as people tried to renew their domain name, he said.

Throughout the process, 24/7 had remained "uncontactable" and provided "poor to non-existent services".

DNC is an industry regulator for .nz web addresses. It has the power to sanction web address providers who do not abide by .nz policy. As far back as May, DNC was warning people that 24/7 was not meeting its requirements but said a change of ownership was in the pipeline.

While 24/7 could not be contacted by The Dominion Post, its Facebook page said there was a new owner and issues were being sorted out. But Gardiner yesterday said there had been no improvement in service.

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