Rio Olympic security fears lift Tait's Brazil division's radio sales

A Sao Paulo police officer uses a Tait Communications portable radio. The 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics have increased ...

A Sao Paulo police officer uses a Tait Communications portable radio. The 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics have increased demand for the product.

A Brazilian double-header of FIFA Football World Cup and Olympics has given Tait Communications a boost.

Tait sells encrypted portable radios to public agencies and security-conscious corporates around the world.

In September last year in Brazil Tait bought its long-time partner SGM Telecomunicacoes, which had been a Tait distributor for more than 20 years.

Tait Brazil president and general manager Luiz Daniel Salomon expects its sales in the country to increase 50 per cent ...

Tait Brazil president and general manager Luiz Daniel Salomon expects its sales in the country to increase 50 per cent next year.

The Canterbury business has since started selling in Brazil in its own right.

Tait's Brazil president and general manager Luiz Daniel Salomon said its Brazil sales were 40 per cent higher in 2015 than the year before.

The company expected 50 per cent more sales next year.

Salomon, who leads Tait Brazil's new "Latin America hub" in Sao Paulo, was in Christchurch this month visiting the company's research and development complex.

Agencies that took precautions for the 2014 FIA World Cup were doing the same for the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics. This had lifted Tait's sales.

Sales growing substantially despite the country's "slight economic crisis," which had created an exchange rate of NZ38 cents to the Brazilian real. Four years ago the Kiwi cross-rate was 75c.

In January Tait said it had won "numerous analogue and digital communications contracts across Brazil's 27 states and throughout Latin America" while working with SGM Telecomunicacoes.

Ad Feedback

Contracts included Sao Paulo Military and Civil Police, Minas Gerais Military Police, State of Parana military police, Companhia Paranaense de Energia and Petrobras, one of the world's biggest oil companies.

Employees in remote parts of Brazil also needed good radio.

Tait said Petrobras had been "dramatically expanding its operations in Brazil" and needed technology in the newly developed northern states of Bahia, Sergipe and Alagoas.

Petrobras workers in these states operated in fertiliser plants, oil and gas pipelines, a gas processing and distribution plant, several oil fields, on land and at sea on oil platforms.

Salomon said Tait had retained distributors for outlying areas but all products were marketed as Tait.

The radios were known for being fast, reliable and tough and the company was nearly a "household name" in parts of Brazil, he said.

 - Stuff

Comments

Ad Feedback
special offers
Ad Feedback