IT firm moves into former Community House building video

CAMERON BURNELL/FAIRFAX NZ.

Press Hall's new lease on life.

Staff from Wellington technology firm Intergen were "ready to rock and roll" when they set foot in their new office in the renovated 85-year-old Community House.

The company shifted from its former offices on Lambton Quay to the Willis St site on Tuesday.

Intergen chief executive Simon Bright said staff walked in on Tuesday and everything - from computers, to the tea and coffee areas - were ready to go.

From the top of the laneway looking down onto Willis St. The laneway is expected to open within the next month.
KEVIN STENT/FAIRFAX NZ

From the top of the laneway looking down onto Willis St. The laneway is expected to open within the next month.

"Uniquely, they [staff] were in at 7.30am, as opposed to 8.30am like they are normally, and they were pretty much ready to rock and roll."

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With only two days under their belts in their new office, Bright said he had already noticed a change.

View from the street of the laneway and Intergen's new offices.
KEVIN STENT/FAIRFAX NZ

View from the street of the laneway and Intergen's new offices.

"Our whole business has lifted. It's an amazing space for us. Comparatively, to where we were, it's a transformation."

The move, of more than 200 staff and their technology, was seamless, he said.

The fit out of Intergen's three floors cost about $1.6 million.

Intergen chief executive Simon Bright and Wellington developer and engineer Maurice Clark.
CAMERON BURNELL/FAIRFAX NZ

Intergen chief executive Simon Bright and Wellington developer and engineer Maurice Clark.

The company's move signalled the first of many into the former Community House and former Dominion Post building.

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In August, the ground floor will feature a courtyard of cafes, bars and restaurants which will spill out along a laneway to Willis St.

The laneway is expected to open within a month.

In October, Transpower will move into the Boulcott St side, which once housed The Evening Post's printing presses.

The six-level structure, which has been gutted, and is being earthquake strengthened, has a project cost of about $10m.

Wellington developer and engineer Maurice Clark said work was on track, despite the amount of work that has had to go into the project.

"Never on budget, always on time."

Clark was pleased to see the first of his tenants move in.

"This has been a hugely exciting project from what was a dunger of a building into the most upmarket, high-tech premises in Wellington, I'd say.

"We are excited about the location in this part of Willis St - we think it'll bring a lot to it. It's not just another ordinary humdinger of an office building."

Clark was looking forward to announcing the restaurants and cafes that would be a part of the ground floor space.

While he could not say who would be moving in yet, Clark said there had been interest from about nine main brand restaurant in the region.

"It's not white table cloth stuff, it's ethnic. We are stealing a lot of restaurants from Courtenay Place, and Cuba St - those sorts of restaurants."

On the menu were eateries that serve sushi, teppanyaki, pizzas, craft beer and gourmet hamburgers, to name a few, Clark said.

The Evening Post's presses were based in Willis St in the first half of the 20th century, before moving to Boulcott St.

The PostThe Dominion and now The Dominion Post have been printed in Petone since the late 1980s.

 - Stuff

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