Prize offered for wearable technology ideas

Apple delved into wearable technology when it launched its first Apple Watch in 2015.
EDGAR SU/REUTERS

Apple delved into wearable technology when it launched its first Apple Watch in 2015.

Government grants agency Callaghan Innovation is offering prize money to entrepreneurs keen on developing wearable technology. 

Callaghan's challenge prize (C-Prize) competition, which is held every two years, has this year been given a "wearable" theme.

Existing examples of wearable technology include smart watches and fitness trackers such as the FitBit.

The propeller on Vortec's winning drone prototype kept it stable in the wind so its camera footage would not be shaky.
Supplied

The propeller on Vortec's winning drone prototype kept it stable in the wind so its camera footage would not be shaky.

Callaghan Innovation chief executive Victoria Crone said it was keen on seeing ideas and designs that would improve health, safety and "smart play". 

READ MORE: 
VorTech wins drone innovation competition backed by James Cameron
James Cameron's eye on the C-prize - improving drone technology for film 
Launch of silent drone aims to advance the film industry

The winner of the competition will win $50,000, a trip to North America and Las Vegas and a year's free rent at the Human Performance Innovation Centre in Auckland. 

Vortec director Ben MacLaren (left) and co-founder Ryan Kurte (centre) played around with drones while they studied ...
SUPPLIED

Vortec director Ben MacLaren (left) and co-founder Ryan Kurte (centre) played around with drones while they studied engineering at Auckland University.

The last C-Prize competition in 2015 focused on drone technology ideas and saw a group of four university friends take out the top prize.

Their idea was to add thrust-vectoring to drones so they would be stable in the wind while filming, co-founder Nishaad Salvapantula said. 

He said, after winning, the group founded a start-up business named Vortec and was in talks with a manufacturer.

Howick brothers Mat Rowe and Seamus Rowe became 2015 C-Prize finalists with their drone silencing idea.
MEGHAN LAWRENCE/FAIRFAX NZ

Howick brothers Mat Rowe and Seamus Rowe became 2015 C-Prize finalists with their drone silencing idea.

A 2015 finalist, Dotterel, secured investment for its noise-reduction drone technology idea since taking part in the competition. 

Ad Feedback

Salvapantula's advice to those thinking of entering the competition this year was to "pour as much as you can into it, because if you go all the way it is worth it". 

Competitors must be over 16 and live in New Zealand.

The Fairfax Media business innovation series runs in partnership with Callaghan Innovation.

 - Stuff

Comments

Ad Feedback
special offers
Ad Feedback