A new generation of job-seekers

Last updated 14:52 31/07/2014

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A new generation of jobseekers has emerged.

Research has found that 73 per cent of of gen Yers - people born between 1980 and 1994 - are using their smartphones when looking for jobs.

Recruitment consultants Robert Walters surveyed New Zealand professionals on how they use technology while job hunting.

They found a significant generational gap in the way jobseekers look for work and for how long they stay in their jobs.

Only half of baby boomers - those born between 1946 and 1964 - use their smartphones at some point in the job-seeking process.

"More and more jobseekers are using their smartphones at the start of the job search and for researching companies they might like to work for," Robert Walters Auckland director James Dalrymple said.

"Employers should take note of this and make sure their sites have been optimised for mobile viewing."

Laptops are still the most popular piece of technology for submitting a job application, but 6 per cent of gen Yers submit their applications through their phones.

Once people find a job, younger workers spend much less time in their roles.

The survey found that baby boomers average three to four years in a job, while the gen Y average is only one to two years.

Dalrymple said the market looked favourably on people who had worked overseas, which might be leading to young people staying in their jobs for shorter periods.

"While the differences in average tenure could be due to the fact that gen Y hasn't been in the work force as long, the results also point to a trend for young professionals to leave New Zealand and gain experience overseas," he said.

"International experience is looked upon favourably by local employers, but on the other hand, the trend to gain experience in larger international markets is creating a shortage in the local market at the three to four years' experience level."

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