More Kiwis plan to leave their job

LAURA WALTERS
Last updated 10:46 24/05/2013

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Two out of five New Zealanders plan to change jobs within the next year, a new survey shows.

Online job site Seek found that of the 1657 fully-employed New Zealanders surveyed, 40 per cent intended to leave their present job, 7 per cent more than last year.

New Zealanders were keen to move for improved variety and content of work, job security and salary, the survey said.

Seek general manager Janet Faulding said the less time someone spent in a role the more open they were to looking for a new position.

Of those who had been in their role less than six months, 58 per cent intended to leave within 12 months, Faulding said.

"This rate of churn decreases the longer an employee stays in a role," she said.

The number of people planning to change jobs dropped to 34 per cent for those who had been in their role more than two years, she said.

It was worth employers focussing on keeping staff that had been with the company for less than a year, Faulding said.

If employees could be encouraged to stay for more than 12 months it was likely they would stay for a further 18 months, she said.

This would decrease turnover, and the costs of recruiting and training new employees.

The results showed younger employees were more transient, with 65 per cent of 18 to 24-year-olds surveyed planning to leave their job in the next year.

However, only 29 per cent of working 65 to 74-year-olds planned to make a move.

The results showed 39 per cent of New Zealanders said a pay rise would keep them in their present jobs.

The top factors that would motivate an employee to stay put were being shown more appreciation and recognition, flexible hours and training opportunities.

Visits to the Seek site in April were up 6 per cent on the same time last year, Faulding said.

Employees may not be actively seeking work but were monitoring the market and she said keeping an eye on available opportunities was often the first step on the job hunt journey.

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- BusinessDay.co.nz

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