Kiwi workers on the move

MICHAEL FOREMAN
Last updated 14:06 05/03/2014

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Almost half of Kiwi workers will consider a job change in the next year, a survey by recruitment company Randstad has found.

Although the figure of 49 per cent was down from the 61 per cent in last year's survey, employers would feel the bite as New Zealand moved towards a talent shortage, Randstad said.

Randstad New Zealand director Paul Robinson said: "With business conditions improving, workers in many industries are feeling more confident they will receive an increase in salary, growth or promotion.

"This is good news for employees. However, it also means for employers these expectations will have to be met, or at the very least addressed, to ensure they continue motivating and retaining a skilled and talented work force."

The Randstad World of Work report found that of the people looking to leave their jobs, 63 per cent would do so to advance their career.

Earning more money or benefits was cited as the motive for a job change by 45 per cent of respondents.

Of the 51 per cent of those who were looking to stay in their job this year, half said a good work-life balance was the leading factor keeping them in their current role.

Being well matched to the job and a strong opportunity for growth and advancement were other reasons workers were happy to stay in their jobs.

The survey found that 46 per cent of New Zealanders had received a pay rise in the past year, while 38 per cent had their pay stay at the same level.

Twenty-two per cent of workers in Australia had a wage cut in the past year and 38 per cent received no pay increase, Randstad said.

Robinson said businesses should make sure they were adequately rewarding their staff, especially their high performers, as conditions improved.

"This is even more important if employees took a pay cut or accepted a salary freeze while conditions were tough," he said.

The survey showed that more than three-quarters of job seekers searched online job advertisements for a new job and about half approached employers directly.

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- Fairfax Media

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