Farmers face penalties for dodgy fires

JACQUIE WEBBY
Last updated 07:10 22/12/2013

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Landowners who stockpile agricultural wraps and plastics planning for a big burnup could find themselves in trouble with the long arm of the law.

From January 1, farmers will not be able to burn polyethylene agricultural silage bale wraps.

Rules for a burning a variety of waste materials generated from domestic and business activities changed in 2011.

Under the Natural Resources Regional Plan (NRRP), anyone burning a variety of materials including metals, treated wood, other plastics, empty containers and other wraps, could be penalised.

First time offenders can expect to pay $300, repeat offenders could face a fine of up to $1050 and persistent offenders could be prosecuted.

Clean air rules apply all year round in residential areas and farmers should check with Environment Canterbury or Rural Fire if they are unsure of what they can burn and when.

Prohibited materials for outdoor burning include treated wood including chip board, particle board and laminated boards, painted, stained or oiled wood; all plastics including agrichemical containers or agricultural wrap; metals and materials containing metals; any fuel with a sulphur content greater than 1 per cent by weight; materials containing asbestos; all rubber including tyres; tar or bitumen; used or waste oil; medical and pathological waste; quarantine and animal waste; motor vehicle parts; paint and other surface coasting materials; and, sludge from industrial processes.

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- The Timaru Herald

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