Fencers to nail world record in Waikato

GERALD PIDDOCK
Last updated 07:32 14/01/2014
Fencing challenge
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WORLD FIRST: A world record will be set later this month in the Waikato for the fastest pair of fencers to put 30 battens on a nine-wire fence. Pictured is the single, six-batten speed fencing challenge, which ran during the 2013 Fieldays.

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An inaugural world record for fence battening will be set at the upcoming Grasslandz Expo in Waikato.

The record will determine how fast two people can put 30 battens on a nine-wire fence.

It was hoped the speed fencing challenge would attract young farmers and fencing contractors who do not usually enter formal fencing competitions, Ken Lawson, sales manager for post-driver company Fairbrother Industries, the competition's organiser, said.

"The competition will provide a stepping stone for anyone who wishes to take their fencing skills further."

The challenge will have two teams of two people competing each other every hour throughout the Expo, which takes place on January 30-31.

The winners would be determined by the fastest pair to erect 30 battens.

The judges would also monitor quality standards and any contestant with more than nine faults would have to add another batten.

The challenge would test fencers speed and skill. They had to be fast but they also had to be able to maintain their quality, Lawson said.

Lawson said the concept of the challenge was suggested by master fencer Wayne Newdick, who wanted to create a fencing competition similar to the speed shearing events that took place at shearing competitions and A&P shows.

"He came up with the idea about how to make a short, quick event that people don't want to hang around for too long," Lawson said.

A single, six-batten speed fencing challenge ran during last year's Fieldays.

"That worked quite well so we thought we would take that a wee bit further," Lawson said.

He predicted the competition would grow into a large event over the next few years and hoped it would become a regular event at A&P shows and field days in Northland, Feilding and Mystery Creek.

Lawson said there had been widespread interest in the competition with six teams entering so far.

"We've put up $1000 for the first prize and there is other prize money."

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- Waikato Times

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