Fruit fly search goes quiet

MICHAEL DALY
Last updated 11:41 09/04/2014
Queensland fruit fly
THE FLY: A Queensland fruit fly

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No more Queensland fruitflies have been found in Whangarei, the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) said today.

Biosecurity officials set more traps after a male fruitfly was caught in a surveillance trap in the Parihaka area of Whangarei on April 1. The find was about 400 metres from the place where another of the pests was found in January.

MPI has warned that if the Queensland fruitfly became established in New Zealand it would have "serious consequences" for the horticultural industry.

Two zones were set up in a controlled area centred on the place where the fruitfly was found last week. Zone A, with 118 response traps, extends 200m from where the pest was found. Zone B, with 200 traps, runs from the edge of Zone A to a circle with a radius of 1.5 kilometres.

Surveillance traps in Zone A had been checked daily and no more fruitflies found, MPI said.

First results from traps in Zone B that are being cleared every three days, came in last night and nofruitflies were found.

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- Fairfax Media

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