Monymusk Gallant may be a record breaker

TIM CRONSHAW
Last updated 12:25 04/06/2013

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A Te Anau bull bought for $71,000 by a farmer syndicate with Canterbury connections has set the bull buying season alight.

The record books were being scoured to confirm if the polled hereford bull, Monymusk Gallant, has set a record South Island price at a sale held on the farm of Chris, Jayne and Henry Douglas.

The nearly two-year-old bull was bought by the syndicate of Chris and Amanda Jeffries from Grassmere Polled Hereford Stud, near Cheviot, and the Kane family from Westholm stud at Tapanui. Semen rights were bought by the Robertson family from Duncraigen stud at Wyndham and James and Becky Murray from Matariki stud at Conway Flat, near Kaikoura.

Bidding for the well-muscled bull started at $7000 and continued until halting briefly at $55,000 before reigniting again.

Chris Jeffries said it was the best bull he had seen so far this year and the syndicate was determined to bring him home.

He said the bull would strengthen the bloodlines of their studs and clients and the high price was good for the breed.

"I would be surprised if it was bettered this season. The previous record was $75,000 so we came close and that was seven or eight years ago at the national bull sale. I remember that bull but I didn't bid for it."

The bull will be based at the farms of the Jeffries and Kanes.

Jeffries said the syndicate could find little fault with the bull and its strong paperwork for growth rates, carcass figures and other attributes matched what they were looking for in a sire to produce offspring able to handle tough hill country.

He said forming a syndicate was a good way of being able to afford a top priced bull and they would look to recoup their investment over time.

"You would have to be pretty well off to go for that money if your were on you own that's for sure. There were lots of other bidders so the pressure was on and he was very sought after on the day."

The Douglas family sold another bull for $23,000 to a North Island buyer at the sale on Thursday.

The possible record setting price is on the back of two herefords reaching $22,000 at the AgInnovation Beef Expo in Feilding last month.

Maungahina stud near Masterton claims to still hold the record price for a polled hereford achieved in 1984 at $80,000.

The bull buying season will continue over the next two weeks in Canterbury.

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- The Press

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