Young inventors steal limelight at Fieldays

Watching the Auckland Gundog Club display.
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Watching the Auckland Gundog Club display.
There are no words.
2 of 20MARK TAYLOR/Fairfax NZ
There are no words.
Meredith Lee (3) with gundog, Nova.
3 of 20CHRIS HILLOCK/Fairfax NZ
Meredith Lee (3) with gundog, Nova.
Tessa and Aden Bradcock sitting in a digger bucket.
4 of 20MARK TAYLOR/Fairfax NZ
Tessa and Aden Bradcock sitting in a digger bucket.
It's an early morning start for the traffic and parking teams.
5 of 20CHRIS HILLOCK/Fairfax NZ
It's an early morning start for the traffic and parking teams.
A spectator watches the Fieldays fencing championship.
6 of 20PETER DRURY/Fairfax NZ
A spectator watches the Fieldays fencing championship.
Early morning breakfast of hotdog is the order of the day.
7 of 20CHRIS HILLOCK/Fairfax NZ
Early morning breakfast of hotdog is the order of the day.
The Fieldays fencing championship.
8 of 20PETER DRURY/Fairfax NZ
The Fieldays fencing championship.
Jessica Basire (L) and Joey Mexted, from Te Awamutu, enjoy lollipops and keep thier heads warm with funny dog hats in the morning cold.
9 of 20CHRIS HILLOCK/Fairfax NZ
Jessica Basire (L) and Joey Mexted, from Te Awamutu, enjoy lollipops and keep thier heads warm with funny dog hats in the morning cold.
Minister of Primary Industries Nathan Guy gets his photo taken with students from Mt Maunganui Intermediate.
10 of 20CHRIS HILLOCK/Fairfax NZ
Minister of Primary Industries Nathan Guy gets his photo taken with students from Mt Maunganui Intermediate.
Yutaka Ishizawa and Mao Hirai, from Japan, check out the Alpacas (Huacawa breed).
11 of 20CHRIS HILLOCK/Fairfax NZ
Yutaka Ishizawa and Mao Hirai, from Japan, check out the Alpacas (Huacawa breed).
The Fieldays fencing championship.
12 of 20PETER DRURY/Fairfax NZ
The Fieldays fencing championship.
Getting inventive with the advertising.
13 of 20MARK TYALOR/Fairfax NZ
Getting inventive with the advertising.
The Fieldays fencing championship.
14 of 20PETER DRURY/Fairfax NZ
The Fieldays fencing championship.
The sun has gone but the crowds are still heaving.
15 of 20MARK TAYLOR/Fairfax NZ
The sun has gone but the crowds are still heaving.
The sun rises over Mystery Creek.
16 of 20KARL DRURY/Fairfax NZ
The sun rises over Mystery Creek.
The Fieldays pavilion, the hub of the show.
17 of 20KARL DRURY/Fairfax NZ
The Fieldays pavilion, the hub of the show.
The Fieldays fencing championship.
18 of 20PETER DRURY/Fairfax NZ
The Fieldays fencing championship.
Another Fieldays, another queue of traffic.
19 of 20CHRIS HILLOCK/Fairfax NZ
Another Fieldays, another queue of traffic.
Parked up but ready to go for another day at the Fieldays.
20 of 20CHRIS HILLOCK/Fairfax NZ
Parked up but ready to go for another day at the Fieldays.

Two young inventors are keeping the spirit of the No 8 wire culture alive at Fieldays, with new gizmos that are turning heads and leaving potential investors wanting more.

Matamata Intermediate schoolboy Patrick Roskam, 12, invented a fencing device, the Gudgeon Pro 4 in 1, and he and Ayla Hutchinson, 13, with her Kindling Cracker, were two of the 12 finalists to pitch for investment by the Innovation Den investors.

The Pitch for Investment event - featuring at Fieldays for the first time - is an opportunity for anyone with a commercially viable idea to make a play for funding.

Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
1 of 11MARK TAYLOR/Fairfax NZ
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
2 of 11MARK TAYLOR/Fairfax NZ
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
3 of 11MARK TAYLOR/Fairfax NZ
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
4 of 11MARK TAYLOR/Fairfax NZ
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
5 of 11MARK TAYLOR/Fairfax NZ
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
6 of 11MARK TAYLOR/Fairfax NZ
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
7 of 11MARK TAYLOR/Fairfax NZ
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
8 of 11MARK TAYLOR/Fairfax NZ
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
9 of 11MARK TAYLOR/Fairfax NZ
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
10 of 11MARK TAYLOR/Fairfax NZ
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.
11 of 11MARK TAYLOR/Fairfax NZ
Ag Art Wear: Wearable Rural Art fashion show at Fieldays 2013.

Patrick got a personal response from invited guests when Sir William Gallagher got up and said it was a good idea and there was an opportunity for it in the New Zealand market. He also walked away with $1000 for the best pitch.

Patrick's patented invention was made for his father and would allow users to drill straight and accurate gudgeon holes to hang farm gates.

"We bought a new farm and dad had to hang 20 gates, and he was very frustrated and I had to do a school science fair project, so I came up with this," he said.

Meredith Lee (3) with gundog, Nova.
1 of 9CHRIS HILLOCK/Fairfax NZ
Meredith Lee (3) with gundog, Nova.
English Springer Spaniel Kip is a hunting/flushing dog.
2 of 9CHRIS HILLOCK/Fairfax NZ
English Springer Spaniel Kip is a hunting/flushing dog.
Nova shows off his bird retreval skills.
3 of 9CHRIS HILLOCK/Fairfax NZ
Nova shows off his bird retreval skills.
Kayla in action at the Auckland Gundog Club demonstration.
4 of 9CHRIS HILLOCK/Fairfax NZ
Kayla in action at the Auckland Gundog Club demonstration.
The police are doing their patrols on these fine looking beasts
5 of 9STACEY OLIVER/Fairfax NZ
The police are doing their patrols on these fine looking beasts
Cows, a Fieldays staple
6 of 9STACEY OLIVER/Fairfax NZ
Cows, a Fieldays staple
OK, so they're not real. But look - cute!
7 of 9@zoeteee
OK, so they're not real. But look - cute!
Yutaka Ishizawa and Mao Hirai, from Japan, check out the Alpacas (Huacawa breed).
8 of 9CHRIS HILLOCK/Fairfax NZ
Yutaka Ishizawa and Mao Hirai, from Japan, check out the Alpacas (Huacawa breed).
Rip the dog. What a dude.
9 of 9MARK TAYLOR/Fairfax NZ
Rip the dog. What a dude.

He was 11 when he designed his first wooden prototype, with a small spirit level stuck on with tape, but that evolved into a 1-metre long, aluminium level with drill guides and built in spirit levels.

He was invited to Auckland by Vodafone's Darren Hopper for help with marketing, and his mother Angela Roskam said the feedback had been "phenomenal".

"We've had feedback from farmers and fencing contractors ... just the dudes walking up and saying, 'I needed this 10 years ago, but good on you mate'. That's awesome."

CUTTING EDGE: Ayla Hutchinson, 13, wowed the crowds with her woodcutting tool, the Kindling Cracker, designed after she saw her mother dodge a nasty injury with the axe.
PETER DRURY/Fairfax NZ
CUTTING EDGE: Ayla Hutchinson, 13, wowed the crowds with her woodcutting tool, the Kindling Cracker, designed after she saw her mother dodge a nasty injury with the axe.

Inglewood High School student Ayla Hutchinson, 13, wowed the crowds with her wood cutting tool, the Kindling Cracker, designed after she saw her mother dodge an injury with the axe.

"My mum nicked her finger when she was cutting kindling and I was doing a science board at the time so I ended up doing something to help fix the problem," she said.

She won the 2013 Fieldays young inventor of the year award, a Fieldays certificate of achievement and intellectual property advice from James and Wells worth $3000.

ENTREPRENEUR: Patrick Roskam, 12, shows off his patented invention, made for his father, that would allow users to drill "straight and accurate gudgeon hole" to hang farm gates.
CHRIS HILLOCK/Fairfax NZ
ENTREPRENEUR: Patrick Roskam, 12, shows off his patented invention, made for his father, that would allow users to drill "straight and accurate gudgeon hole" to hang farm gates.

Ayla's original design had an axe head welded to a base plate with the edge pointed upwards.

Timber was placed on the axe edge and struck with a mallet to split into kindling.

She said it worked "really well" but after consultation with her father she decided to add a safety cage.

"First, I came up with the problem and then I did a little bit of research on it and played around with the axe, just sorting out which way," she said.

She priced the cutter at $80 and needed a minimum of 50 orders to put the unit into production. By the end of the second day she had more than 150 names in her book.

"It feels a bit unreal. I didn't expect to get this far.

"I didn't even expect to win in the science fair, but it brought me here."

Mr Hutchinson was at Fieldays to promote his own new invention and said Ayla was a "chip off the old block".

"We're a bit inventive.

"It's probably a bit in the blood for her and she's done a great job over there."

WINNERS

Best pitch: Patrick Roskam

Most viable business: Raglan's Droidworx

Best use of technology: Hamilton's Progressive Group

Waikato Times