Quay to be bigger, stronger

ALAN WOOD
Last updated 05:00 12/06/2014

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A new design for Cashin Quay 2 will significantly boost berth capacity for Lyttelton Port, the listed company says.

The wharf rebuild is a key project for the South Island's busiest port, and follows on from an insurance payout settlement announced last year of $438 million plus GST. Lyttelton Port of Christchurch expects the project to provide additional berth space, based on a larger, deeper, stronger and more resilient structure.

The port is dividing the work on Cashin Quay into stages. Late last year the port said the first third of the quay project would cost about $50m.

This week, chief executive Peter Davie said Port of Christchurch will put between $10m-$12m of its own money into the Cashin Quay 2 project to strengthen the infrastructure against further earthquakes.

Once complete, the container terminal, which includes Cashin Quay 2 and other wharf space, will have a combined quay length of 570 metres, compared with 410m before the February 2011 earthquake.

It will be able to accommodate two large container vessels at once.

Cashin Quay 2 would be delivered in stages, with the first 55m section available later this year and the full 230m complete towards the middle of 2015.

Cashin Quay 2 was using the latest technology and once complete would be the most seismically resilient wharf in NZ.

"It will have a deeper berth capable of accommodating larger vessels in the future and include a crane rail which wasn't in place prior to the earthquakes."

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- The Press

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