Reclamation plans for port

ALAN WOOD
Last updated 05:00 26/06/2014

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Lyttelton Port's reclamation into Te Awaparahi Bay could spread to 35 hectares as part of a $1 billion expansion plan over 30 years.

Within the total the port will spend $450 million over the next five years bulking up berths and handling facilities to cope with forecast annual container volume growth of 5-7 per cent.

That work spreading the port to the east away from Lyttelton township is partly quake damage reinstatement work following an insurance payout settlement of $438m earlier this year, chief executive Peter Davie says.

Separately there was a lot of other remedial or quake repair work to be done on the other wharfs including $40m of work on the oil wharf while it continues to operate.

The company has already hired an extra 80 or so contractors for quake-related work following damage in 2010 and 2011, that will be split into about 45 projects over time. Eventually more than 100 contractors will be employed on repair work.

Davie said already started was an $80m project to restore 230 metres of Cashin Quay 2.

Another big ticket item was a $40m paving project for the wider Cashin Quay container area.

"Our view is we should end up with a facility that's second to none. I know that wharf we're rebuilding at CQ2, it's the strongest in the country from a geotech etc perspective."

Davie said the port had reached 5.5 hectares on its existing reclamation project. The port already had consent for 10ha being filled with earthquake rubble in the next two years.

Over a much longer period the port plans to extend its reclamation area into Te Awaparahi Bay within Lyttelton Harbour to 30-35 hectares, to move containers away from the township.

"We still haven't ascertained how far out we're going to push, where our berth line will be and where our breakwaters will be," Davie said.

"So we'll be looking at that going forward."

There is likely to be some opposition to further reclamation from groups including the Green Party.

Davie said growth in the last four years had been extraordinary.

"The volume of containers through our terminal is up just over 40 per cent since the earthquakes started, so we've had real growth. I would say cargo comes and goes a bit . . . (but) we're forecasting about 5-7 per cent compounding growth," Davie said. The port's volumes were up by about 7-8 per cent on an annual basis according to the latest stats, he said.

The company's Z wharf on the western end of Cashin Quay was "absolutely had it, so unlikely to be remediated", Davie said.

The port is yet to make a formal decision on its old administration building near the roundabout on Norwich Quay but it is very likely the multi-storey building will be demolished due to the high cost of repair.

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Davie said funds would be set aside for a new head office building to take in operating and administration hubs.

- The Press

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