Accountants get stronger voice

Last updated 05:00 07/07/2014

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The boss of a merged trans-Tasman accounting group says New Zealand's voice will be amplified, rather than drowned out by a chorus of Aussie twang.

Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand officially launched this week, replacing the New Zealand Institute of Chartered Accountants and its Australian counterpart.

The new body brings together more than 100,000 bean-counters, in a strategic move partly aimed at garnering more influence over public policy.

Australian-based chief executive Lee White said some members had posed questions about New Zealand being overshadowed during the consultation phase. "The New Zealand voice flowing into a trans-Tasman voice . . . will be strong, and enhanced," he said.

More than a third of the group's members were New Zealand-based, and leadership roles had been distributed fairly, White said.

"I believe there has been a very even split in the governance mechanism of our organisations."

The group's chairman is New Zealand-based, as is the vice-president, who will replace the president on a rotational basis next year.

"I do also have a New Zealand country head who works directly with me, and she in effect operates as the CEO for the country," said White.

Member offices around the country had been left untouched, he said.The group intended to advocate on core issues, such as taxation, without getting bogged down in politics. 

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- BusinessDay.co.nz

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