'No end' to strong demand for skilled labour

TOM PULLAR-STRECKER
Last updated 09:41 07/07/2014

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The employment market is booming, according to the latest quarterly data from Trade Me.

The listing and auction site reported the total number of job vacancies advertised through its website during the three months to the end of June was up 19 per cent on the same period last year.

Head of jobs Peter Osborne said that was despite the seasonal "handbrake" usually applied by the Easter and Anzac holidays. All 15 regions of New Zealand experienced some growth in advertised vacancies over the period, which Osborne said was unusual.

He expected the growth to continue, saying there was "no end in sight" to strong demand for skilled labour in Auckland.

Average national pay was flat at $60,881, which Osborne said was a little unexpected given the tight labour market.

"If demand for workers continues to outstrip supply, wage inflation is inevitable as employers offer fatter pay packets in a bid to entice staff."

Job-listings growth was up a massive 65 per cent in Southland, but up only 2.2 per cent in Taranaki. The three main centres of Auckland, Christchurch and Wellington experienced increases of 21.2 per cent, 20.5 per cent and 14.3 per cent, respectively.

Demand was highest for skilled information technology, engineering, construction and legal workers.

"Anyone with decent skills in these areas ... is in a great position if they are hunting for new opportunities," Osborne said.

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