Taupo council seeks consent review on lake

Last updated 05:00 27/06/2012

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Taupo District Council has backed an early review of Mighty River Power's resource consents on Lake Taupo in an attempt to stop lake-shore erosion.

At a council meeting yesterday, Taupo Mayor Rick Cooper asked Waikato Regional Council to review Mighty River's resource consents granted in 2006 for a 35-year period.

The resource consents, which allowed Mighty River to operate lake levels at similar to natural levels, authorised flood and erosion management on Lake Taupo and Waikato River through the control of the lake level, and the water flow to the central and lower reaches of the Waikato River.

In a letter to the regional council, tabled at the meeting, Mr Cooper said the regional council had an opportunity to review the consent in April next year.

"Lake-shore erosion is a big issue for Taupo ratepayers and every opportunity should be taken to address factors which may contribute to the erosion."

There was evidence that erosion was linked to the management of lake levels, he said. Beachfront erosion had occurred at settlements Kuratau, Hatepe, Five Mile Bay, Motutere,Waitahanui and Taupo.

Erosion had undermined wastewater pipes, public reserve land, roading, campsites and stormwater outlets causing repairs paid for by ratepayers.

Mighty River was not solely responsible but its consent conditions did not provide for it to mitigate the effects, or prevent them arising, he said.

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- The Dominion Post

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