Kiwis like to mix business and pleasure

Last updated 12:51 10/07/2012

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New Zealanders are more likely than their global counterparts to find love in the workplace, with almost two thirds of Kiwis mixing business with a dash of pleasure while on the clock.

That's according to the Randstad Workmonitor survey, which polled 14,000 employees across 32 countries in the three months to June 30.

The study found that 63 per cent of Kiwi respondents had seen a romantic relationship occur in the workplace, compared with a global average of 57 per cent.

Still, New Zealand did not top Cupid's chart, with 70 per cent of workers in China and Malaysia having seen love blossom between colleagues. At the other end of the scale the prevalence of worker relations was much lower in Japan and Luxembourg, with the measure coming in at 33 per cent and 36 per cent respectively.

Not that it's a bad thing, according to Kiwis. Almost 70 per cent of New Zealanders said an office romance didn't have to become a problem, although 37 per cent of those involved in a workplace relationship admitted that it impacted on their job performance.

New Zealand also placed highly in the workplace friend ratings, with 83 per cent of workers stating that friendships with colleagues need not interfere with work.

The study found that three out of every five workers socialised with their workmates outside of the office, and 71 per cent had a close relationship with a co-worker. That was about on par with the global average, which topped by Brazil and Hong Kong at 91 per cent.

Luxembourg again came in at the bottom of the scale, with only 20 per cent of employees in the European tax haven making good friends with their office associates.

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