Parking machines caught out by daylight saving

SAM BOYER
Last updated 05:00 04/10/2012

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First Jetstar, now Wellington City Council - it seems the budget airline wasn't alone in being caught out by the clocks going forward.

Wellington City Council parking fines issued on Monday may yet be deemed invalid, after wardens printed infringement notices without noticing the pay-and-display machines were printing already-expired times.

Council spokesman Richard MacLean confirmed yesterday that "a handful" of machines in Tory St in the central city remained an hour behind after Sunday morning's time change.

"It sounds like we had a small number of pay-and-display machines in Tory St that didn't roll over.

"The phone hasn't exactly been running hot. It appears it was just a handful of machines."

The council would not be reviewing all the tickets issued in the area at the time, but he said: "If something is very wrong, people will give us a call. If anyone feels hard done by, they should write in to us."

Upper Hutt resident Peter Jones noticed the parking peculiarity when he parked in Tory St on Monday at 11.04am.

He paid $4.50 by text message and received a ticket showing the time as 10.04am - so he approached a parking warden issuing tickets nearby.

He got the warden to sign and validate the time on his ticket so that he would not get a fine.

But when he returned to his car at 11.45, many cars on the street appeared to have been issued fines, he said.

"He [the warden] just continued up the street writing tickets."

Wellington lawyer John Miller said anyone who received a parking fine at that time could challenge the council.

"There's a Latin term for this: ex turpi causa non oritur actio. No-one can take advantage of their own wrong.

"People have put their money in and they've complied with the law, [but] the ticket says otherwise."

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- The Dominion Post

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