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Bakery fined after hand crushed

Last updated 14:09 07/12/2012

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A Glen Innes, Auckland, bakery has been ordered to pay $40,000 after a worker's hand was crushed. 

Abe's Real Bagels was yesterday fined $34,000 and ordered to pay $4000 reparation after appearing in the Auckland District Court charged under the Health and Safety in Employment Act. 

The court heard that on February 27 an employee of the Hannigan Drive, Glen Innes, business was using a machine to make bagel crisps, and when dough stuck to one of the rollers he attempted to clear it while the machine was still operating. 

His right became trapped and he suffered crush injuries to his middle and ring fingers, the court heard. 

"The employer had a duty to ensure that all practicable steps were taken to ensure the safety of employees," Department of Labour, northern division general manager, health and safety, John Howard, said.

He said "all that was required" to keep the worker safe was fixed guarding and for the company to update their procedures. 

"This did not happen and as a result an employee suffered significant and avoidable injuries," Howard said.

"Even though the principles of machine guarding are well known, people are still seriously injured and killed because machines are poorly guarded or not guarded at all. It is essential that all employers and employees understand the hazards associated with the use of machinery in the workplace."

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- Auckland Now

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