'Business as usual' at vineyard despite Mainzeal

Last updated 05:00 13/02/2013

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It is business as usual for the Waiheke Island winery caught up in the Mainzeal receivership issue.

Richina Pacific bought Te Motu Vineyard from the Dunleavy family and shareholders in 2011. Richina also bought the property formerly known as Isola Estate.

Richina is the parent company of Mainzeal Property and Construction, which went into receivership on Waitangi Day.

Chef Bronwen Laight says that last Thursday morning she and her fellow workers were told to carry on as normal at The Shed restaurant at Te Motu Vineyard.

Winemaker John Dunleavy says it's "business as usual".

"We've been told we shouldn't be affected. The Shed is still open and the vineyard is operating as usual.

"We have been out putting nets on the vines."

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- BusinessDay.co.nz

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