Key: High dollar good

Last updated 09:15 26/02/2013
John Key
GRAHAME COX
JOHN KEY: "For a lot of New Zealand consumers, their life's actually a lot better because of the strong dollar."

Relevant offers

Industries

Auckland Council will no longer buy land for parks in established suburbs Magnate Hugh Green's family urged to settle differences over family trusts Unison Networks defends price hike for consumers with solar panels A timely lesson from our Aussie supermarket cousins Several possible reasons for Countdown closures, says First Retail Group Ray White signs deal with Lianjia as it launches into China Woolworths Australia tipped to sell Ezibuy as part of restructure Australian parent Woolworths closes six Countdowns House prices could fall 11 per cent by late 2019, as building catches up: Infometrics Woolworths Australia to close dozens of stores, cut 500 jobs

Prime Minister John Key says the high Kiwi dollar improves the lives of many New Zealanders, despite it being cited as a reason behind job cuts.

The high value of the currency, even dubbed by a market analyst in the US as "the new gold", was "not a one-way street", Key told TV3's Firstline this morning.

"For a lot of New Zealand consumers, their life's actually a lot better because of the strong dollar.

"You can either buy things at imported inflation, petrol's cheaper. It's not a one way street. Even for a lot of manufacturers, it's a big help."

He told Firstline the dollar becoming more popular with international currency investors was a signal the economy was doing well.

Brian Kelly of Shelter Harbor Capital told CNBC he was eyeing the kiwi because he expected it to stay strong.

 "New Zealand can't do anything about devaluing their currency," he told CNBC.

"It's a small enough market where you can get a lot of people running towards the door if there is a currency-denting stimulus move."

Key's comments on the dollar follow a raft of companies announcing job cuts or potential redundancies this year.

Almost 200 jobs would go at Summit Wool Spinners in Oamaru and about half the 400-strong workforce at Mainzeal faced redundancy after the construction firm was put into receivership.

Power company Contact Energy also announced it was to shed 100 of its 1100 staff.

Manufacturing companies told an Opposition-initiated inquiry the high New Zealand dollar was curbing investment and harming profits.

Ad Feedback

- Stuff

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content