Kiwis struggle to balance family and work

Last updated 13:21 27/02/2013

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More than a quarter of Kiwi respondents in a new survey say they sacrifice sleep to juggle their personal and work commitments.

The survey by workplace provider Regus showed 26 per cent of workers reported getting up earlier or going to bed later than they otherwise would, to fit in their job and family needs.

Some respondents also said more flexible working arrangements could help them spend more time with their children - 15 per cent said a shorter commute would help and 16 per cent said more flexibility in terms of location would do the same.

However, things were changing in the workplace, with just over half of the businesses surveyed reporting that their management was being rewarded for creating a more flexible workforce.

Regus Asia Pacific director John Henderson said the good news was that more than half of the firms in the survey recognised that management needed to take the first step, but there were still grounds for improvement.

"The win-win situation is clear and with a huge majority [of respondents] saying that flexibility is directly related to retaining staff, the upside for businesses is huge," Henderson said.

Most of the respondents believed a better work-life balance was beneficial for their employer, with 81 per cent saying it would lead to improved productivity and 87 per cent saying it would improve staff retention.

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