Overstayer's company in liquidation

MARTIN VAN BEYNEN
Last updated 05:00 26/03/2013

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A long-term Christchurch overstayer has hit the financial rocks with the liquidation of his main trading company, which owes nearly $300,000 to Inland Revenue.

La Famia No 2 Ltd, trading as La Famia Function Centre at Wigram Manor, was placed in liquidation last month by a resolution of the shareholders.

Harmon Wilfred, believed to be one of New Zealand's longest-term overstayers, is a director and shareholder of the company.

Wigram Manor was the former Air Force Officers' Club. It housed a large contingent of IRD staff after the Canterbury earthquakes.

Liquidator Murray Allot, in his first report, said the company had not traded profitably for some years and relied on shareholder support and unsecured advances to keep operating.

His report shows the company has assets of about $36,000 with preferential creditors claiming $365,000. Employees are owed $9570 in holiday pay and $61,000 in awards against the operation made by the Employment Relations Authority (ERA).

Inland Revenue is owed $66,810 in GST and $228,000 in PAYE payments. General creditors are owed $246,000.

Entities connected with Wilfred have lost five unjustifiable-dismissal cases before the ERA in the past six months.

Wilfred's wife is part of the wealthy Dare family, who own a large foodstuffs group based in Ontario, Canada. She remains in New Zealand on a business visa, and Wilfred manages her business interests. Her cash injections have kept the various business ventures afloat.

In 2005, Wilfred, who came to New Zealand in 2001 and is on his third marriage, formally renounced his United States citizenship after being upset by family support claims and other concerns about the United States Government. He was still pursuing New Zealand citizenship last year.

He claims to have introduced the CIA to his financial network in the 1990s and to have found billion-dollar frauds by the CIA over funds meant for Guatemala. He alleges he is victim of a CIA conspiracy.

Immigration New Zealand will not comment without a personal waiver from him.

In December 2011 he filed papers with Immigration New Zealand to show why he should not be deported. One of his submissions was: "I am a stateless person. I do not see how it is possible that I am eligible for deportation."

Wilfred does not speak to The Press.

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- The Press

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