Setback for refunds firm

TAMLYN STEWART
Last updated 05:00 24/06/2013

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Christchurch entrepreneur Steven Brooks has lost another round in a legal row over what name he can use for his online tax refunds business.

Brooks had appealed against a Court of Appeal judgment which ruled in favour of the largest player in the online tax refunds market, NZ Tax Refunds Limited, founded by accountant Cilla Hegarty.

The Court of Appeal had issued an interim injunction barring Brooks, owner of My Refund Limited, from using the name Tax Refund NZ as a trade name or domain name as the names were too similar.

The Supreme Court dismissed Brooks' appeal on Friday and ordered him to pay $2500 in costs.

Hegarty's NZ Tax Refunds also has an interim injunction barring Brooks' company from using another name - NZ-Tax Refund and its associated website.

NZ Tax Refunds last year took legal action against Brooks and his associated companies My Refund Limited and Brooks Homes Limited.

NZ Tax Refunds claimed they had breached the Fair Trading Act and were "passing off" their services as those of NZ Tax Refunds by using the trade names NZ-Tax Refund and Tax Refund NZ, and setting up website addresses using those names.

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- BusinessDay.co.nz

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