Ferrari puts brakes on staff emails

Last updated 07:29 05/07/2013

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Ferrari has put the brakes on mass staff emails in a bid to get employees to talk to each other.

United Kingdom media are reporting that the luxury car manufacturer said it was targeting time wasting and inefficiency by limiting the number of people staff can send emails to.

Ferrari's 3000 staff at its Maranello plant in Italy would be the main target.

From now on, each Ferrari employee would only be able to send the same email to three people in-house, Ferrari said in a statement.

"Ferrari's employees will be talking to their colleagues more from today forward," Ferrari said.

"To incentivise more efficient and direct communication within the company, the decision has been made to place much stricter limits on the number of emails being sent.''

A computer programme will be installed to prevent the addition of a fourth recipient, according to UK media.

"The injudicious sending of emails with dozens of recipients often on subjects with no relevance to most of the latter is one of the main causes of time wastage and inefficiency in the average working day in business,'' Ferrari said.

"Ferrari has therefore decided to nip the problem in the bud by issuing a very clear and simple instruction to its employees: talk to each other more and write less."

New Zealand employment consultancy business owner Max Whitehead said Ferrari could be shooting itself in the foot with the new policy.

"It seems a little bit over the top," he said.

Sales and management staff would need to send group emails, and if Ferrari was restricting the number of people staff could send work-related emails to it could damage the business, he said.

However, the company did have the legal right to limit the amount of people emails were sent to, he said.

While Ferrari was targeting work emails, Whitehead said the policy could be a good idea if it was aimed at personal emails.

"I do think email and social media use should be controlled."

Whitehead said he had not heard of any New Zealand employers doing the same thing.

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- BusinessDay.co.nz

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