Demo firm gains global recognition

MICHAEL FOREMAN
Last updated 14:35 29/11/2013

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A Kiwi demolition company is hoping to pick up more international business after it was named Contractor of the Year at the World Demolition Awards in Amsterdam.

Penrose-based Nikau Contractors beat more than 100 international challengers to win the award.

Nikau director John Paul Stil said this was the first time a company outside Europe had scooped the top award and Nikau was the first southern hemisphere winner.

"We have almost more work than we can manage at the moment in New Zealand, but what this award will mean is that our international work will take off as well," he said.

"International clients look around the world for companies that can deal with the most technical demolition and salvage jobs and we have now proven we can foot it with the best global companies."

The company said it has been working across New Zealand as the country experiences something of a housing boom, and has been heavily involved with preparing Christchurch for its multibillion-dollar rebuild.

The company has been in business for 30 years and has completed 4500 demolition jobs. Nikau is also the owner of a multimillion-dollar 65-metre high-reach excavator nicknamed "Twinkle Toes", which is claimed to be the third-biggest demolition excavator in the world.

"People probably imagine demo crews as people driving big cranes with wrecking balls attached," Stil said.

"But actual wrecking balls are just a part of the picture – we are more about remediating and transforming environments with a range of tools, and when you throw in some of the challenges we are faced with, like hazardous materials and other dangers, the solutions have to be a lot more sophisticated and wide-ranging than that."

Privately owned Nikau employs about 100 people. The company said it expects to turn over $20 million in revenue this year.

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- Fairfax Media

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