Consents soar after quakes

GEORGINA STYLIANOU
Last updated 05:00 10/01/2014

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Canterbury's biggest building booms in the last 40 years have now been outstripped by post-earthquake consent numbers.

Statistics New Zealand (SNZ) data showed a 32 per cent increase in the number of consents issued for new homes in 2013 compared to 2012.

Canterbury usually accounted for about 15 per cent of consents for new dwellings nationwide but last year the region averaged about 26 per cent.

SNZ industry and labour statistics manager Blair Cardno said Selwyn and Waimakariri were the first to experience a "real upswing" in new home growth but in the past 12 months Christchurch had "jumped right into the mix".

Consent numbers in the city had "increased rapidly in recent months" and had now started to overtake numbers from the building boom in the middle of the last decade.

There were 5462 building consents for new homes and apartments in Canterbury last year compared with 3955 in 2012 and 2363 in 2011.

More than $1.3 billion worth of earthquake-related building consents have been granted in Canterbury in total since September 2010, SNZ data showed.

Last year, 2293 building consents for new homes were issued in Christchurch City, 1235 in Selwyn and 1241 in Waimakariri.

Stonewood Homes managing director Brent Mettrick said the past six months had seen a large increase in new home consents in the city.

"We're running at about 20 per cent of our work in Waimakariri and Hurunui, 30 per cent in Selwyn and 50 per cent in Christchurch city, whereas that used to be 30-30-30," he said.

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- The Press

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