Kiwi firm helps run sales taxes

TOM PULLAR-STRECKER
Last updated 05:00 03/02/2014

Relevant offers

Industries

Chart of the day: Peaks and troughs in bonds for Dunedin rentals Home building costs climb 3.5pc, but they should start to ease Environment Minister Nick Smith announces $19m plan to deal with 'blot' of tyre mountains Holiday-makers and migrants still finding NZ attractive Fairfax NZ photo library set to return home after US wrangle Reserve Bank keeps official cash rate on hold Risk averse? That's no way to describe New Zealanders, Sir Ray Avery says Former Commerce Commission boss to lead ATEED Year eight student teaches MPs a lesson in coding Mondelez promises not to destroy Dunedin Cadbury factory's chocolate-making machines

Wellington software firm Data Torque is enjoying a growth spurt bringing sales taxes to the developing world.

The 30-person software firm, which has developed tax collection systems for dozens of countries around the world, has inked a deal which will allow the government of the Bahamas to introduce a New Zealand-style GST.

It has also completed the first stage of a tax system that will allow Kiribati to introduce its first value-added sales tax on April 1.

Data Torque has opened its first permanent overseas office, in the Seychelles, to expand its activities in Africa.

Spokesman Daniel Wallis says the International Monetary Fund is insisting more developing countries introduce a sales tax as a condition of receiving ongoing aid.

The goal is to make those countries' fiscal systems more sustainable.

Ad Feedback

- Fairfax Media

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content