Fenwick to guide Greenlane

FIONA ROTHERHAM
Last updated 05:00 13/04/2014
GREENIE: Rob Fenwick
GREENIE: Rob Fenwick

Relevant offers

Industries

Hawke's Bay Seafoods says it is co-operating with investigation IAG chief Jacki Johnson is New Zealand's top dollar executive Lower Hutt company fined after worker loses four fingers Market crash, not natural disasters, biggest threat to economy Shareholders are spurning Briscoe's takeover offer, says Kathmandu Dairy goat infant formula and waterproof roads get Government cash Inland Revenue hopes to get politics out of its $1b-plus overhaul NakedBus NZ liquidation application filed by Go Bus Aorangi Securities directors receive banning orders for company failures NZX 50 up, NZ dollar below US64c as global markets stabilise

Veteran greenie Rob Fenwick will chair the board of and invest in clean tech company Greenlane Biogas.

The Kiwi exporter of biogas technology had an injection of funds late last year from well-known local investors Tenby Powell and Sharon Hunter who plan to reclaim its position as a world leading supplier of biogas equipment. Greenlane's former parent, the Flotech Group, went into receivership in 2012 but continued to trade after being bought out by some of the original shareholders.

Fenwick said his stake would be under 5 per cent in the company, which he had a "good feeling" about. "It's on the right side of history. There are a number of international developments that are happening that point to it having strong growth in the next two to three years."

Biogas comes from the breakdown of material such as manure, industrial and household waste. Greenlane's equipment turns these gases into biomethane fuel. It has built about 70 plants globally, including the world's largest in Montreal, Canada.

Fenwick said there was a growing recognition big cities had to clean up their organic waste streams and a thirst for renewable energy sources of which biogas was predominant.

Fenwick and his partners established Living Earth, which makes compost by diverting organic waste from landfills, 20 years ago. It is now the largest business of its kind here. He's also chaired Antarctica NZ since 2007.

Ad Feedback

- Sunday Star Times

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content