Mobile banking has a limit

RICHARD MEADOWS
Last updated 12:26 17/06/2014

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Most people are happy to transfer cash with their mobile devices, but draw the line at sums of $50,000 or more, according to Westpac.

The findings come from Westpac's second Mobile Banking Report, based on a survey of 820 of its customers.

While 70 per cent were confident using mobile banking to transfer up to $10,000, only 15 per cent were comfortable when dealing with $50,000 or more.

Seventy-three per cent used mobile banking to pay bills, up 9 percentage points, and 55 per cent used it to pay friends, up 7 percentage points.

Roughly one in four customers were also using their mobile devices to check interest rates or find a branch or ATM.

Benefits identified by those surveyed included better awareness of their finances (67 per cent), paying bills on time (54 per cent), ease of use (65 per cent), and time-saving (68 per cent).

The proportion of people identifying the benefits were all up modestly from the last survey in October.

The report also showed that while the use of tablets was growing strongly, the smartphone was still the gadget of choice.

Respondents were less enthused about the advent of "wearable technology" like Google Glass and smart watches.
One in four of said they were likely to use them, and half of those said they would use them for banking.

Westpac chief digital officer Simon Pomeroy said the report underlined the "convenience and control" customers wanted to have over banking.

"They can do what they want, when they want, from wherever they want," he said.

Mobile banking has experienced rapid growth in New Zealand, seven times faster than the uptake of internet banking at similar stages.

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- Stuff

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