ASB bill-paying app steals a march

Last updated 05:00 08/08/2014

Relevant offers


Receivers to close seven NZ Pumpkin Patch stores, 57 job losses Real estate agents put too much pressure on, Kiwis say How to make your Lotto windfall last Canines are top-dogs when it comes to household spending on pets Kiwis lavish $800 million a year on dogs - but can we afford it? 'Unaffordable' Auckland forces teacher out Auckland Council warns of credit card scam after woman falls victim Vanguard to release tobacco and bomb-free funds for KiwiSaver Lotto winner complains to tribunal over real estate deal gone sour Insurers back down from rigid sum insured policies

A new electronic payments technology could ensure everyone pays their fair share of a boozy BYO restaurant bill, without having to get up from the table.

ASB has introduced a New Zealand-first gadget called Accept mPOS (mobile point of sale), which enables businesses to receive wireless payments on the spot.

When paired with an iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch via Bluetooth, it can accept eftpos and debit-credit cards using a magnetic stripe, chip, or tap-and-go.

The ability to accept payment in any form means ASB has leapfrogged its rivals in the rapidly evolving field.

BNZ had originally planned to roll out a fully integrated upgrade of its Payclip dongle in March or April, but that has been delayed until later in the year.

ASB's other point of difference is the payments interface it uses, with the phone app allowing extra functionality like bill-splitting and tipping.

Diners will be able to pay individually using whichever method they want without having to queue at the counter.

The software also allows merchants to email receipts, with a print-capable device for those who prefer paper.

ASB's executive general manager of technology and innovation, Russell Jones, said the bank was formally launching the product at the end of the month, but many merchants were already using the service successfully.

Jones said the pricing of the service had not been finalised, but the idea was to offer a variety of options in the same fashion as existing eftpos terminals.

The next phase would involve further improvements to both the hardware and software.

Some industries could have purpose-built features, for example allowing tradespeople to log a job's completion or create a summary report.

Jones said user testing had shown people preferred the companion device to be separate from the phone, rather than physically plugged in.

Other banks including ANZ, Westpac and Kiwibank also offer apps that allow businesses to collect payments on the spot, using a phone.

However, they are not as convenient in that customers have to manually input card details, rather than swipe or touch-and-go.

Ad Feedback

- BusinessDay


Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content