IT jobs boom promising higher wages

Last updated 12:10 18/01/2013

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A spike in new technology projects and confidence will create at least 1850 new job opportunities in the information technology industry this year, says recruiter Absolute IT.

The recruiter surveyed 500 employers and said three-quarters planned to hire additional IT staff this year, compared with 70 per cent when it conducted a similar survey this time last year.

It forecast the number of job openings would be up 16 per cent on last year.

Thirty-eight per cent of employers surveyed cited new projects as the reason they expected to take on extra staff, a 13 per cent increase compared with January 2012.

"We're seeing an immediate need to bolster headcount to meet new project demands, driven largely by central government change, some major projects in local government and increased business and customer demands in the private sector," said Absolute IT director Grant Burley.

A higher level of recruitment activity for permanent staff in the private sector reflected growing employer confidence and indicated a move to a "more settled workforce", he said.

Worker satisfaction was continuing to rise with 86 per cent of job seekers considering their workplace a good place to work, the survey found.

Almost two-thirds of IT staff planned to look for new work in 2013, consistent with previous years.

"Things are also positive on the remuneration front," Burley said. "We're seeing 40 per cent of employers saying they're going to provide a pay rise in 2013. Forty per cent are still considering it and only 16 per cent ruled it out."

"Competitive remuneration is a crucial component to helping curb the brain drain. As our data consistently shows, money is the main reason talent move overseas.

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- The Dominion Post

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