We're splurgers, not savers

Last updated 14:54 16/09/2013

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New Zealanders are making spending decisions based on what they want rather than what they need, a survey shows.

A survey of 367 Kiwis by Chinese whiteware company Haier, which looked at spending habits, found three-quarters of those surveyed said they were "savers" but had a tendency to indulge in a little splurging.

Short-term gain outweighed long-term pain when choosing what to splurge on, with budgets often overlooked when dining out, selecting entertainment and buying fashion items, the results showed.

However, respondents were less likely to splash out on investment items, Haier said.

More than 50 per cent of those surveyed were willing to buy new technology only when their current model needed replacing.

Dishwashers, washing machines and cars ranked as the items New Zealanders were least likely to splurge on, the survey found.

Nearly 50 per cent of respondents said their spending habits were affected by their mood.

Nearly half attributed their splurge to a special occasion such as a wedding or birthday party that they said they needed to buy something for, the results showed.

Reasons for investing in such splurges were based on feeling good, looking good and something tasting good, Haier said.

"Respondents confessed to spending a little extra on clothes because they form a part of your identity."

One respondent admitted chocolate and wine, whilst never on the shopping list at the supermarket, still made it into the trolley as an indulgence after a hard day.

Manage My Money budgeting adviser Kayne Wahlstrom said the results were not surprising.

"What people need to understand is that it is OK to splurge, if you spend less in other areas to compensate."

As the cost of living continued to rise, it was increasingly important for Kiwis to understand the importance of budgeting and investment decisions that had long-term benefits, he said.

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- BusinessDay

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