Association warns of bank scams

Last updated 05:00 11/12/2013

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The New Zealand Bankers' Association is warning people to be on the lookout for fraud and scams that could put a damper on the holiday season.

"Don't let fraudsters spoil this special time of the year," NZBA chief executive Kirk Hope said. "Whether we're shopping or away on holiday, it pays to take care."

It was a good idea for people to tell their bank if they were heading overseas, Hope said.

"That way, transactions you make in another country won't surprise your bank. It's also important that your bank has up-to-date contact details in case they need to get hold of you."

Bank cards, online shopping and mobile banking can all be targeted by scammers.

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment figures show Kiwis were swindled out of almost $4 million last year.

Four thousand scams were reported, and more than 700 people lost money.


Guard and treat your card like cash.

Never tell anyone your Pin – not even your family.

Shield the Pin pad with your hand to prevent criminals from "shoulder surfing" or using hidden cameras.


Don't use links that appear to take you to your bank's website – type in the address in full.

A padlock symbol indicates a secure connection and the address starts with "https" rather than "http".

Don't use public computers and public wi-fi for internet banking.

Shop with trusted retailers.

Keep anti-virus and firewall software up to date.


Only get apps from trusted sources.

Keep your device and apps updated.

Use the password lock feature.

Change passwords periodically, and ensure they can't be guessed easily.

Use anti-virus software if available.

Contact your bank immediately if you lose your phone.

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- BusinessDay

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