Reserve Bank warns of scam

MICHAEL FOREMAN
Last updated 14:46 29/01/2014

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The Reserve Bank is warning people to avoid fraudsters who use the central bank's name in an attempt to make their scams appear genuine.

Typically scammers would tell people they needed to make a small payment in order to get a large sum of money back from a tax refund, inheritance or some type of unclaimed money, the Reserve Bank said.

The scammers asked for immediate payment by internet money transfer, a remittance service, or by entering credit card details into a form on a website.

Reserve Bank spokesman Angus Barclay said he had dealt with one successful fraud and one attempted scam in the past fortnight.

"Last week a woman walked in with a receipt for $200. She was expecting us to provide some paperwork which would allow her to claim a tax rebate," Barclay said.

"This week another woman rang in as she became suspicious when she was asked to pay $1800 to an outfit in Texas so that she could claim an inheritance.

"That's just two recent cases that I've been involved with. My colleagues have dealt with others, so it is going on."

The Reserve Bank said scammers used its name to persuade victims that the scam is genuine - but the central bank was not involved with tax refunds, transfers of unclaimed money, or settling deceased estates.

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- Fairfax Media

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