Low bar set for bids on old West Coast pub

LIZ MCDONALD
Last updated 11:50 17/05/2014
Jacksons Tavern

PUB WITH NO BEER: The historical Jacksons Tavern on the West Coast is empty and the hunt is on for a new owner.

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The beer taps, the heavy timber bar and the grey stone fireplace remain, but no drinks have been poured at Jacksons pub for a year.

But that could be about to change. The historical West Coast pub goes up for auction in Christchurch next week.

Century-old Jacksons is on a hectare of land on the Otira Highway (State highay 73), west of Arthur's Pass township near the turnoff to Lake Brunner. It has been closed since its lease expired last year with no new takers.

Owners Mark and Kelli Tammett, of Christchurch, are now keen for someone else to take the place on.

Marketing agent Peter Harris, of Bayleys, said tough times for country pubs had led to many going on the market, especially with modern attitudes to drink-driving deterring patrons.

He did not want to comment on how much Jacksons could fetch, but described the reserve price as low. It has living quarters included, and no earthquake damage.

"It's still got everything inside it, all the chattels and plant and memorabilia are still in place."

A buyer could reopen the pub, or use the place as a cafe, craft outlet or holiday home, Harris said.

The hotel was built in 1910 and replaced two earlier versions nearby. The first Jacksons hotel was built in the 1860s as a travellers' staging post but was washed away in floodwaters, and a second burned down.

The name came from local brothers Adam and Michael Jackson, the latter of whom was an owner of the hotel.

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- The Press

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