Fortune 500 firm buys Kiwi tech company

TAMLYN STEWART
Last updated 14:18 07/11/2012

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A United States Fortune 500 company is snapping up Christchurch health services software firm Emendo Limited.

Pharmaceutical distribution and healthcare information technology company McKesson Corporation today announced it has signed a deal to acquire Emendo.

The Christchurch firm develops and sells software called CapPlan which helps hospitals forecast and manage patient activity, which helps reduce costs and improve service for patients.McKesson, ranked 14th on the Fortune 500, called CapPlan ‘‘a natural extension’’ of its own McKesson Technology Solutions’ software offering.

Emendo chief executive Dave Tinkler said the value of the deal was confidential but it was a ‘‘very positive’’ step for the Christchurch firm.

All Emendo’s staff had accepted new employment contracts with McKesson New Zealand Limited.

The firm has about 22 staff in Christchurch and about 30 worldwide.

Tinkler will head up McKesson New Zealand.

Emendo’s CapPlan is used in more than 40 hospitals in New Zealand, Australia, Canada and Britain to forecast future patient activity and help health systems to allocate resources efficiently while identifying unnecessary costs.Emendo was founded in 2002 by Nick Burns and Bart Visscher.

McKesson Provider Technologies Health Systems Performance Management president Chris Bauleke said there was an estimated $700 billion in waste across the US healthcare system, much of which resulted from inefficiencies that could be reduced with better visibility of patient flow and the use of capacity management solutions.

‘‘The potential savings and increased revenues from improved management of staff and other key assets are especially attractive as pressure mounts to reduce costs,’’ he said.

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- BusinessDay.co.nz

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